Europe’s outlook in 2014

An unhealthy sense of complacency about Europe’s economic and political outlook pervades European policymaking circles. It does so despite the fact that the European periphery’s economy is still very depressed, which is driving a disturbing political divide between the euro’s southern and northern member countries. And there are few reasons to expect that the year ahead will bring progress either in reducing Europe’s record unemployment rate or in preventing a further fragmentation of its politics.

One of the more striking features of the European political economy over the past three years has been the radicalization of its politics. In Greece, for example, at the start of the economic crisis in early 2010, its two main centrist political parties, New Democracy and PASOK, received around 70 percent of the vote. Today, after six years of painful economic recession, those parties command barely 30 percent of the vote and extremist parties on both the left and the right have ascended.

Click here to read the full text at The American.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Desmond
Lachman

What's new on AEI

Retirement crisis is hyped
image Why the Foley beheading will force Obama to continue US airstrikes
image How the New York Times misguides their readers on Internet regulation
image US still has time to stake out a position of strength on Ukraine
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 18
    MON
  • 19
    TUE
  • 20
    WED
  • 21
    THU
  • 22
    FRI
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled today.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.