Schooling them: 'Parent trigger' is a big deal - but systemic education reform is bigger

Reuters

Eight-year-old Abraham Zamarripa sits in the audience in support of Patrick DeTemple, director of NGO Parent Revolution, who is speaking during a Adelanto School District board meeting regarding the parent trigger law, in Adelanto, California March 6, 2012. The law allows parents of students at under-performing schools in California to force major changes through a petition as long as 51 percent of parents agree to do so, according to local media.

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  • Parent trigger is a big deal - but systemic education reform is bigger.

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  • Rick Hess of @AEIeducation: it's a mistake to overhype parent trigger

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“These parents did it,” Ben Austin, director of Los Angeles-based Parent Revolution, said of the parents at Desert Trails Elementary in Adelanto, Calif. “They are the first parents in America to win a parent trigger campaign. It’s a big deal.” Austin is right. It is a big deal and, potentially, a good one.

The parents at Desert Trails were the first at any school in the U.S. to employ the “parent trigger” — a California law that allows a majority of parents at a lousy school to petition the school board in order to force major changes. The changes can range from firing the principal to converting the school into a charter school.

California’s trigger law currently applies to about 1,300 schools identified as “failing” by the state’s accountability system. In Adelanto, enormous drama ensued when Desert Trails parents filed two petitions, only to have the school board insist that they lacked the requisite number of valid signatures.

"The parent trigger’s power is that it enables impassioned parents to break the grip of school boards that placidly preside over educational malpractice year after year." -Frederick M. HessThe squabble found its way to court, where, it was announced on Monday, San Bernardino County Superior Court Judge Steven Malone ruled for the parents. The Adelanto board’s resistance illuminates the case for the parent trigger. Last year, less than one-third of students passed the state reading exam, less than half were proficient in math, and not even a quarter were proficient in science. And yet the board fought parents insisting on change.

The parent trigger’s power is that it enables impassioned parents to break the grip of school boards that placidly preside over educational malpractice year after year. Absent the parent trigger, it’s unclear how the parents at Desert Trails could have forced a change. They could have tried to elect a new school board majority, but parents at a single school usually find it immensely difficult to do so, especially in board elections dominated by school-system employees.

That said, it’d be a mistake to overhype the parent trigger. Parents don’t necessarily have the skills or knowledge to drive school improvement. That’s especially true in low-performing schools, which typically serve families with limited education or political prowess. Pursued ineptly, the trigger could spur even more ineffectual governance, as families bicker and micromanage. (Chicago’s extensive experience with site-based school management in the 1980s and early 1990s raised just such concerns.)

This matters a lot: We’re likely to see a lot more schools going the way of Desert Trails. The parent trigger has been adopted in Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana — and was endorsed by the U.S. Conference of Mayors earlier this summer.

The parent trigger is a positive step for long-suffering schools, but it’s no solution. It’s just a chance to push dysfunctional schools onto a new path. Whether would-be reformers are willing and able to help parents seize this fresh start — by providing tough-minded guidance, helping to recruit high-quality school operators, and policing the bad actors — will help determine whether it ushers in real change or amounts to one more faddish reform.

Frederick M. Hess is director of educational policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

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About the Author

 

Frederick M.
Hess
  • An educator, political scientist and author, Frederick M. Hess studies K-12 and higher education issues. His books include "Cage-Busting Leadership," "Breakthrough Leadership in the Digital Age," "The Same Thing Over and Over," "Education Unbound," "Common Sense School Reform," "Revolution at the Margins," and "Spinning Wheels." He is also the author of the popular Education Week blog, "Rick Hess Straight Up." Hess's work has appeared in scholarly and popular outlets such as Teachers College Record, Harvard Education Review, Social Science Quarterly, Urban Affairs Review, American Politics Quarterly, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Phi Delta Kappan, Educational Leadership, U.S. News & World Report, National Affairs, the Washington Post, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Atlantic and National Review. He has edited widely cited volumes on the Common Core, the role of for-profits in education, education philanthropy, school costs and productivity, the impact of education research, and No Child Left Behind.  Hess serves as executive editor of Education Next, as lead faculty member for the Rice Education Entrepreneurship Program, and on the review boards for the Broad Prize in Urban Education and the Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools. He also serves on the boards of directors of the National Association of Charter School Authorizers and 4.0 SCHOOLS. A former high school social studies teacher, he teaches or has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Pennsylvania, Georgetown University, Rice University and Harvard University. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Government, as well as an M.Ed. in Teaching and Curriculum, from Harvard University.


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