Raising the cost of crime

Article Highlights

  • Increasing state-maintained databases of criminal offenders' #DNA profiles could have a chilling effect on crime

    Tweet This

  • Criminals in #DNA database are far more likely to be caught if they commit a crime, far less likely to commit new crimes

    Tweet This

  • Adopting the U.K. approach of registering #DNA of those suspected of serious offenses would save 415 lives/year

    Tweet This

This article appears in the March 19, 2012 issue of National Review.

Perhaps the first and foremost role of the government is to protect its citizens from crime. It can do so by providing active and visible police protections, and by vigorously pursuing and prosecuting criminals once crimes have been committed. There have been many crime-fighting innovations in recent years, and crime rates have fallen sharply at the same time. But there has been little hard evidence that all of the high-tech techniques contributed to the crime reduction. Until now.

One innovation of the past two decades has been the spread of state-maintained databases of criminal offenders' DNA profiles. The databases make it easier for the authorities to find and ultimately capture suspects. In principle, this increased capability could have a chilling effect on crime as potential criminals abandon illegal pursuits in the face of higher odds of conviction. 

"Doleac's results suggest that adopting the U.K. approach would save 415 lives per year. And compared with increasing police forces, expanding a DNA database costs almost nothing." - Kevin A. HassettStanford University economist Jennifer Doleac has written a fascinating new paper that explores the impact on crime of DNA databases. The paper exploits random variation in the timing of database expansions. Different states have different criteria for putting people into their databases, and have often changed those criteria. They typically expand their databases following widely publicized "if only" cases: cases in which terrible crimes could have been prevented if only the database had been more inclusive. For example, California added incarcerated felons to its DNA profiles after it was revealed that a man who was convicted of raping 14 women had served time for a felony burglary years earlier. Had his DNA been in the system after that incarceration, he probably would not have been able to commit so many rapes.

Doleac compares criminals who were released before database expansions took effect with those released afterward. She finds that those in the database are far more likely to be caught if they commit a crime, and far less likely to commit new crimes in the first place.

The scale of her findings is quite striking. The nearby chart shows the results of a simulation based on her evidence. A hypothetical 50 percent increase in average data base size, which in 2008 would have been an increase from about 177 to 266 profiles per 10,000 residents, has a statistically significant effect on crime rates. It would result in a 13.5 percent reduction in murder, a 27.2 percent reduction in rape, a 12.2 percent reduction in aggravated assault, a 12.0 percent reduction in larceny, and a 22.7 percent reduction in vehicle theft, as well as a statistically insignificant (5 percent) reduction in burglary.

 

 

While a 50 percent increase might be difficult to achieve without arousing concerns about civil liberties, the U.S. could choose to follow the lead of the United Kingdom, where all arrestees suspected of serious offenses are included in a database. In the U.S., the addition of arrestees for serious felonies would increase the database size by 12 percent, which would still have a significant impact on crime. The FBI's Uniform Crime Reports show that 12,996 murders were committed in the United States in 2010. Doleac's results suggest that adopting the U.K. approach would save 415 lives per year. And compared with increasing police forces, expanding a DNA database costs almost nothing.

DNA databases have significantly increased the safety of our citizens. Policymakers should explore ways to expand them without prompting fears of Big Brother.

Kevin Hassett is a senior fellow and director of economic policy studies at AEI.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Kevin A.
Hassett
  • Kevin A. Hassett is the State Farm James Q. Wilson Chair in American Politics and Culture at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He is also a resident scholar and AEI's director of economic policy studies.



    Before joining AEI, Hassett was a senior economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and an associate professor of economics and finance at Columbia (University) Business School. He served as a policy consultant to the US Department of the Treasury during the George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton administrations.

    Hassett has also been an economic adviser to presidential candidates since 2000, when he became the chief economic adviser to Senator John McCain during that year's presidential primaries. He served as an economic adviser to the George W. Bush 2004 presidential campaign, a senior economic adviser to the McCain 2008 presidential campaign, and an economic adviser to the Mitt Romney 2012 presidential campaign.

    Hassett is the author or editor of many books, among them "Rethinking Competitiveness" (2012), "Toward Fundamental Tax Reform" (2005), "Bubbleology: The New Science of Stock Market Winners and Losers" (2002), and "Inequality and Tax Policy" (2001). He is also a columnist for National Review and has written for Bloomberg.

    Hassett frequently appears on Bloomberg radio and TV, CNBC, CNN, Fox News Channel, NPR, and "PBS NewsHour," among others. He is also often quoted by, and his opinion pieces have been published in, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post.

    Hassett has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in economics from Swarthmore College.

  • Phone: 202-862-7157
    Email: khassett@aei.org
  • Assistant Info

    Name: Emma Bennett
    Phone: 202-862-5862
    Email: emma.bennett@aei.org

What's new on AEI

image Recovering from tax time blues
image 10 welfare reform lessons
image Let HHS nominee Sylvia Burwell explain Obamacare lie
image Why bold ideas backfire in politics
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 14
    MON
  • 15
    TUE
  • 16
    WED
  • 17
    THU
  • 18
    FRI
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 | 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Calling treason by its name: A conversation with Liam Fox

Join us at AEI as the Right Honorable Liam Fox sits down with Marc Thiessen to discuss and debate whether America’s intelligence agencies have infringed on the personal privacy of US citizens.

Event Registration is Closed
Thursday, April 17, 2014 | 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
The curmudgeon's guide to getting ahead

How can young people succeed in workplaces dominated by curmudgeons who are judging their every move? At this AEI book event, bestselling author and social scientist Charles Murray will offer indispensable advice for navigating the workplace, getting ahead, and living a fulfilling life.

No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.