The immigration-policy fence
Conservatives should not build one between themselves

Border by Jim Parkin / Shutterstock.com

We may not be building a fence between the U.S. and Mexico, but conservatives on different sides of the immigration debate are busy building one between themselves. Supporters of a “comprehensive reform,” as they call it, see opponents as irrational or even bigoted. Opponents of what they call “amnesty” see supporters as naïve and unprincipled.

This division is not going away soon and may grow more bitter as Congress considers legislation. There is nothing wrong with a vigorous debate among conservatives, of course, but there are a few things each side should keep in mind while the heat rises.

Let’s start with the supporters.

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