Margaret Thatcher showed the world what a woman can do

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  • Do we look like female impersonators?

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  • Like a determined housewife faced with domestic anarchy, she went about setting the country right.

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  • Among her many remarkable qualities and larger virtues, Mrs. Thatcher was the embodiment of female excellence.

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When my book Who Stole Feminism? was published in 1994, I was subjected to an array of feminists’ epithets — anti-woman, traitor to my gender, backlasher. But my favorite was one critic’s reference to “Christina Hoff Sommers and Margaret Thatcher — those two female impersonators." Below is a photo of Lady Thatcher and me in 1995. Do we look like female impersonators?

Well, keep that to yourself. (It was a bad era for jackets and hairdos.) But I am honored to be paired with Margaret Thatcher in any way, shape, or form. She was, in addition to being one of the greatest leaders of our age, a consummate female.

When Mrs. Thatcher (as she was called in her heyday) came to power in 1979, Great Britain was in chaos. Inflation and unemployment were ruinously high, and productivity and economic output were plunging. Violent strikes by coal miners, garbage collectors, and gravediggers produced blackouts, rotting garbage piles in the streets, and abandoned corpses. Fearful citizens were hoarding food. “To put it bluntly,” says Andrew Sullivan, “the Britain I grew up in was insane.” In his magnificent tribute, “Thatcher, Liberator,” Sullivan writes:

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Christina Hoff
Sommers

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