Charles Morrison

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Systematic Chinese cyber espionage has resulted in significant damage to U.S. national security.

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7-second takeaway

Supporting uncontroversial airstrikes against ISIS does not make a candidate a national security leader. A much more revealing test is a candidate’s position on defense spending.

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7-second takeaway

Declining military budgets and world events are caught in a mutually destructive spiral.

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7-second takeaway

If the US military keeps shrinking, no amount of innovation or advanced technology will make up for real losses in combat power.

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Image Credit: David B. Gleason (Flickr) (CC-BY-2.0)

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Although American internationalism is not cheap, it ultimately costs more to manage crises — as we had to on June 6, 1944 — than to solve problems before they spiral out of control. 

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Image Credit: David B. Gleason (Flickr) (CC-BY-2.0)

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Removing ONA’s independent role within the Pentagon bureaucracy would effectively eliminate its most important contribution: direct, undiluted, and holistic assessments.

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If the nation wishes to maintain its preponderant regional position, it must develop a coherent military strategy that walks through a hypothetical conflict from its strategic background, to its opening hours, to intra-conflict escalation control, to its final conclusion.

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