Jennifer K. Marsico

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Will women be the deciders in the 2014 elections? It’s definitely possible, but understanding the women’s vote involves busting a few myths about women at the polls.

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This week, Election Countdown welcomes AEI Resident Fellow Michael Barone for a discussion of how a shift in public opinion on foreign policy may affect some key midterm races.

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Twenty years ago this week, 367 members of Congress stood on the Capitol steps and signed a document called the Contract with America. Although several polls in October 1994 showed that around 70% of Americans were not aware of the Contract, its positive, forthright agenda infused GOP leaders and activists with energy and contributed to massive change in the 1994 elections.

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On Sunday, thousands of people are expected to gather in New York City to take part in the People’s Climate March to protest perceived inaction on climate change. The marchers claim to have public opinion on their side. But do they? Here are our 5 takeaways from recent survey data about global warming.

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As the countdown to the 2014 midterm elections continues, the October issue of AEI’s Political Report looks at public opinion on key electoral measures.

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Three years ago, a diverse collection of protestors began assembling in New York City’s Zuccotti Park. Known as Occupy Wall Street for their opposition to large financial institutions on Wall Street, their numbers swelled for a time. The movement got a huge amount of media attention, and pollsters tested the waters. Were Americans turning against Wall Street and the free enterprise system? How did they view inequality? We watched the polls closely at the time and have continued to monitor them. Views about Wall Street deteriorated sharply after the financial crash.

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Passive dissatisfaction is the order of the day, rather than an active, energized one that brings many voters to the polls. That may be why the polls in so many hot Senate contests this fall aren’t moving much. But for most Americans, the new harsher economic reality may temper the “throw the bums out” mentality.

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Americans are lagging indicators when it comes to economic improvement, slow to see positive news and often worried that there will be backsliding. Today’s disappointing jobs report, with fewer jobs gained than expected, will underscore the pessimism in the polls.

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