Joseph Gyourko

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As America finally emerges from the housing crisis, new research raises important questions about how future crises can be prevented and how federal housing policy can be targeted more transparently toward the families it intends to help.

 

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Current Federal Housing Administration (FHA) policy fails in its mission to help many first-time and financially contrained homebuyers achieve homeownership; to make matters worse, FHA has failed to remain financially solvent. In this paper, Joe Gyourko proposes phasing out FHA over a period of years and replacing it with a plan that offers simplicity, transparency, sustainability, and safety.

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Home mortgage

It’s time for bold thinking about how to move forward to promote homeownership while protecting the homeowners and the taxpayers.

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Drawing on original risk analysis, Wharton School professor Joseph Gyourko explains why FHA’s failure to accurately account for the unemployment risk in its Single-Family Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund is a key cause of its increasing share of seriously delinquent loans and the insolvency of its main insurance fund.

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The Obama administration’s push for expanded home loan availability to borrowers with weaker credit has rekindled the debate over Federal Housing Administration (FHA) lending practices.

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A house sits for sale in newly built subdivision of single family homes in San Marcos, California February 29, 2012.

It was no surprise to this observer when the recently released 2012 fiscal year actuarial review of the Federal Housing Administration’s (FHA’s) main single family mortgage insurance fund concluded that it was insolvent.

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At this AEI event, Wharton professor Joseph Gyourko discusses the implications of his research on the Federal Housing Administration. Edward Pinto, AEI scholar and housing finance expert, will respond.

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As the US debt continues to grow, HUD officials still fail to own up to the massive liabilities on their books that could cost taxpayers mightily. In a point by point refutation, Wharton professor Joseph (Joe) Gyourko responds to HUD’s attack of his recent AEI report.

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HUD recently issued its first official response to the report “Is FHA the Next Housing Bailout?”, providing important insight into the perspective of HUD’s leadership on the issue of the solvency of the FHA insurance fund.

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