Nick Schulz

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7-second takeaway

At this event, Mary Eberstadt, Nick Schulz, and W. Bradford Wilcox will discuss these and other changes in America’s family structure over the last half-century, in the process examining important economic and cultural consequences on the horizon.

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Home Economics130x188

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Image Credit: Shutterstock

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Businessmen note the new AOL Time Warner sign outside Time Warner headquarters in New York on January 12, 2001.

7-second takeaway

Complaining about the cable company is a hearty American pastime: the reliability of its service, the channels it has on offer, the inability of its repairmen to show up on time.

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7-second takeaway

In considering the past and potential future of American agriculture, we will come to understand better the roots of American economic greatness. We may also gain insights into where the next waves of technological innovation may come from and what they may mean for the country and the world.

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Image credit: Hurricane Sandy (Wikimedia Commons)

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Image credit: Bisongirl (Flickr) (CC BY 2.0)

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Tim Chae is seen in an office space where he attends "500 Startups," a crash course for young companies run by a funding firm of the same name, in Mountain View February 16, 2012.

7-second takeaway

When editors of Life magazine ranked Thomas Edison first on the list of “the most important people of the last 1000 years,” they were recognizing the importance of innovation to improving the material condition of mankind.

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