Vincent Phillip Munoz

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Any hope for a decisive ruling or for legal coherence regarding the Pledge of Allegiance will need to wait another year.

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Soonthe Supreme Court will decide the Newdow case, ruling on whether public-school teachers may include the words “under God” when leading students in the Pledge of Allegiance.

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The Supreme Court has interpreted the Establishment Clause in a manner that encourages and sometimes demands hostility towards religion.

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Representative Jim McDermott wishes not to say “under God” while reciting the Pledge of Allegience, but others may do so, according to their constitutionally guaranteed freedoms.

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Michael Newdow may have become what he purports to fight against: a dogmatic believer in his own moral and intellectual superiority who is blind to the weaknesses in his own position.

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With the Locke v. Davey ruling, the Supreme Court majority not only endorsed religious discrimination, they constitutionally sanctioned it.

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By publicly displaying the Ten Commandments, weteach thatthat the American legal tradition is fundamentally different from the Mosaic legal code, to which the Ten Commandments belong.

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With two decisive decisions that return to Madison”s writings, the Supreme Court could reconstitute its religion jurisprudence, reinvigorating a robust protection for religious liberty.

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