Conservatism and the Quest for Community
Bradley Lecture by William Schambra

The quest for community will not be denied, for it springs from some of the powerful needs of human nature—needs for a clear sense of cultural purpose, membership, status, and continuity." As sociologist and AEI scholar Robert Nisbet argued in The Quest for Community (Oxford University Press, 1953), twentieth-century American liberalism elevated the centralized national state as the source of community-mindedness for Americans, at the same time undermining the roles traditionally played by family, neighborhood, voluntary association, and other traditional groups. With a new president pledging to bring us together as one great, postpartisan national community, it is clear that Nisbet’s description of liberalism is still accurate. How can conservatism respond to this challenge and begin to revitalize some of the more traditional sources of community in America? William Schambra, senior fellow and director of the Hudson Institute’s Bradley Center for Philanthropy and Civic Renewal, will deliver the December Bradley Lecture at AEI.

William Schambra is the director of the Hudson Institute's Bradley Center for Philanthropy and Civic Renewal. Prior to joining the Hudson Institute in 2003, Mr. Schambra was director of programs at the Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Before joining the foundation in 1992, he served as a senior adviser and chief speechwriter for Attorney General Edwin Meese III, Office of Personnel Management director Constance Horner, and Secretary of Health and Human Services Louis Sullivan. He was also director of social policy programs for AEI and codirector of AEI's "A Decade of Study of the Constitution." From 1984 to 1990, Mr. Schambra served as a member of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, to which he was appointed by President Ronald Reagan. From 2003 to 2006, he served on the board of directors of the Corporation for National and Community Service. He has written extensively on the Constitution, the theory and practice of civic revitalization, and civil society in the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times, Policy Review, Christian Science Monitor, Nonprofit Quarterly, Philanthropy, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, and Crisis and is the editor of several volumes, including As Far as Republican Principles Will Admit: Collected Essays of Martin Diamond (AEI Press, 1992).

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Events Calendar
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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Graduation day: How dads’ involvement impacts higher education success

Join a diverse group of panelists — including sociologists, education experts, and students — for a discussion of how public policy and culture can help families lay a firmer foundation for their children’s educational success, and of how the effects of paternal involvement vary by socioeconomic background.

Thursday, April 24, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Getting it right: A better strategy to defeat al Qaeda

This event will coincide with the release of a new report by AEI’s Mary Habeck, which analyzes why current national security policy is failing to stop the advancement of al Qaeda and its affiliates and what the US can do to develop a successful strategy to defeat this enemy.

Friday, April 25, 2014 | 9:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Obamacare’s rocky start and uncertain future

During this event, experts with many different views on the ACA will offer their predictions for the future.   

No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled today.
No events scheduled this day.