Education policy debate: A federal right to education? - AEI

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Experts Debate. Audience Decides.
Motion: The Supreme Court was wrong on Rodriguez; there should be a federal right to education.

Event Description

The AEI Education Policy Debate Series brings together experts of opposing views to debate some of the most contentious issues in education policy. This competition of ideas unfolds before a live audience, which then votes at the end of the debate to decide the winner.

In 1973, the Supreme Court ruled 5–4 that there is not a federal right to education. This landmark decision, San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez, was controversial from the outset, and it remains so today. Questions continue to abound about the federal role in ensuring equal access to education and, absent a federal right, whether states can ensure equity.

Join AEI for a wine and cheese reception and a debate between leading scholars on whether the Supreme Court was wrong on Rodriguez and whether there should be a federal right to education. The audience will vote at the beginning and at the end to determine the winner.

Join the conversation on social media with #AEIDebate.

If you are unable to attend, we welcome you to watch the event live on this page. Full video will be posted within 24 hours.


Agenda

5:45 PM
Registration and wine and cheese reception

6:00 PM
Welcome and audience initial vote

6:05
Debate

Participants:
Derek Black, University of South Carolina School of Law
Earl Maltz, Rutgers Law School
Ilya Shapiro, Cato Institute
Kimberly Robinson, University of Virginia School of Law

Moderator:
Nat Malkus, AEI

7:05 PM
Audience final vote and results

7:15 PM
Adjournment


Event Contact Information

For more information, please contact Connor Kurtz at [email protected], 202.862.5809.


Media Contact Information

For media inquiries or to register a camera crew, please contact [email protected], 202.862.5829.

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