Special Topic: ?

Center on Higher Education Reform

American higher education has long been considered the best in the world. But concerns about the cost and quality of a college education, lackluster completion rates, and ballooning student debt have raised questions about the sustainability of our traditional approach to postsecondary education. Can the policies and institutions that served us so well for most of the 20th century answer the demands of the 21st without fundamental reform?  To answer these questions, AEI’s Center on Higher Education Reform (CHER) conducts independent, data-driven research and policy analysis designed to inform policymaking and shape the reform conversation.

A set of core principles will guide CHER’s work

Options and Choice: Students need an array of postsecondary options to choose from and the information necessary to find one that fits their goals, academic needs, and budget.

Shared Responsibility: Just as students must be prepared for college-level work, colleges must be prepared to provide students a high-quality education.

Productivity and Sustainability: Funding and financial aid policies should provide incentives for institutions and students to spend public investments wisely.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation: To bend the cost curve and enhance performance, reformers must rethink regulatory policies that inhibit innovation and limit competition.


Latest Content

Share Mark as favorite

college_student_cost_shock_surprise_shutterstock_500x293

A bipartisan coalition in the House of Representatives introduced a bill that would repeal the ban on a federal student unit record system, thus providing students and parents with vital information on earnings and loan repayment rates from institutions and individual programs.

Share Mark as favorite

Defult_Student_Loans_Money_Shutterstock_500x293

On Saturday, cultural critic Lee Siegel argued in the New York Times that student loans are in fact immoral, and that defaulting is the path to liberation. This is, quite possibly, the worst advice you could give, especially to low-income students.

Share Mark as favorite

Sanders (I-VT) uses a bullhorn to speak to supporters gathered outside a town-hall campaign stop at New England College in Concord, New Hampshire May 27, 2015. Reuters

Instead of making public college free for all students, policymakers should look to foster more entrepreneurship in higher education while giving all institutions a real stake in their students’ success.

Share Mark as favorite

I’m here today to discuss how the federal government can give the colleges and universities it helps to finance a greater stake in student success and college affordability. Specifically, the question before us today is how a risk-sharing policy, where colleges would bear some financial responsibility for a portion of the federal loans that their students do not repay, might better align the incentives of colleges, students, and taxpayers.

Share Mark as favorite

Graduates attend commencement at University of California, Berkeley in Berkeley

Although competency-based education (CBE) has made considerable inroads in higher education, strategies are needed to improve state, accreditor, and federal oversight of CBE programming.

Share Mark as favorite

college_students_loans_shutterstock_500x293

In cases where borrowers can conclusively prove that a college knowingly misled them using inaccurate data or false advertising, loan relief is a straightforward remedy. Policymakers can’t stop there, though. If an institution’s students cannot pay back their loans, the school should be on the hook to pay back a portion of the loan balance.

Share Mark as favorite

adult_education_degree_college_shutterstock_500x293

Adults may not have a clear sense of the costs and benefits of further education. To the extent adults are foregoing college because they don’t recognize the costs and the benefits of these other options, it represents a lost opportunity for both individuals and for the economy.

Share Mark as favorite

Americans see higher education as necessary, but too expensive and not well-suited to those with work and family commitments. Also, many adults without a degree do not aspire to a higher credential, but report being satisfied with their current level of education.

Share Mark as favorite

college_students_study_shutterstock_500x293

At a time when Americans’ anxiety about the nation’s higher education system is at a peak, a debate focused largely on how much we spend would represent a missed opportunity to pursue fundamental, longer-term reforms.

Share Mark as favorite

college_education_books_shutterstock_500x293

Using a new survey, this report explores how adults without a college degree perceive the postsecondary education system as a whole and the costs and benefits of their potential options.

Sort By:

Refine Content:

Scholar

Additional Keywords:

Refine Results

or to save searches.

Open
Refine Content