Special Topic: ?

Center on Higher Education Reform

American higher education has long been considered the best in the world. But concerns about the cost and quality of a college education, lackluster completion rates, and ballooning student debt have raised questions about the sustainability of our traditional approach to postsecondary education. Can the policies and institutions that served us so well for most of the 20th century answer the demands of the 21st without fundamental reform?  To answer these questions, AEI’s Center on Higher Education Reform (CHER) conducts independent, data-driven research and policy analysis designed to inform policymaking and shape the reform conversation.

A set of core principles will guide CHER’s work

Options and Choice: Students need an array of postsecondary options to choose from and the information necessary to find one that fits their goals, academic needs, and budget.

Shared Responsibility: Just as students must be prepared for college-level work, colleges must be prepared to provide students a high-quality education.

Productivity and Sustainability: Funding and financial aid policies should provide incentives for institutions and students to spend public investments wisely.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation: To bend the cost curve and enhance performance, reformers must rethink regulatory policies that inhibit innovation and limit competition.


Latest Content

Share Mark as favorite

Competency-based education, in which credit is provided on the basis of student learning rather than credit or clock hours, is starting to gain traction with educators and policymakers, but many questions about it remain to be answered.

Share Mark as favorite

shutterstock_660661121

By doubling down on this troubled model, the President’s plan would spend more without solving the structural problems that plague it.

Share Mark as favorite

shutterstock_589827011

If you were listening for new higher-ed ideas in the State of the Union last night, you probably felt like it was 2009 all over again.

Share Mark as favorite

U.S. President Barack Obama pauses while speaking about college cost initiatives during a visit to Pellissippi State College in Knoxville, Tennessee, January 9, 2015. Obama wants to make two years of community college free and universally available, a proposal he said on Thursday he would flesh out in his State of the Union speech later this month. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Conservatives should second the president’s point about the importance of postsecondary education, while asking whether those workers would be better served by a centrally managed “public option.”

Share Mark as favorite

obama_phoenix_education_jobs_housing_010815_900x557

The implicit assumption of free-tuition plans is that the main reason students don’t finish community college is the cost of tuition. Not, say, the fact that somewhere around 50-60 percent of community college students are not college-ready, or that many community colleges are not designed with student success in mind.

Share Mark as favorite

As a busy year in higher education policy draws to a close, it’s time to look forward to 2015. What should higher ed leaders and wonks be paying attention to in the new year?

Share Mark as favorite

higher_education_college_students_university_reform_shutterstock_500x293

After years of tinkering and partisan bickering, there are now opportunities for meaningful higher education reform. Congress should not let those opportunities slip away over the next two years.

Share Mark as favorite

college_student_studies_shutterstock_1000x667

The existing higher education system is not narrowing gaps between high- and low-income families; rather, it is widening them.

Share Mark as favorite

employee_cubicle_work_job_shutterstock_1000x667

Vocational offerings like career and technical education or apprenticeships are treated as an option of last resort for struggling students, not a critical on-ramp to a successful and productive life. Rethinking the balance our education system strikes between education and training would help grow our economy without sacrificing the things that have made American education great.

Share Mark as favorite

Higher ed reformers need to be cognizant of the strengths and weaknesses of the institutions they rely on to accomplish their goals.

Sort By:

Refine Content:

Scholar

Additional Keywords:

Refine Results

or to save searches.

Open
Refine Content