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Jobs

After an upswing at the beginning of this year, the labor market is back in the doldrums. The latest report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics said the U.S. economy created just 114,000 jobs in September, and although the unemployment rate fell to 7.9 percent, the workforce remains shrunken. And even those gloomy numbers obscure the suffering of the long-term unemployed and the millions of workers who have dropped out of the labor force in the aftermath of the recession. Stay up-to-date on the state of the labor market with AEI’s economic experts, and find out their ideas for how to get America back to work.

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121715work

7-second takeaway

Are direct government spending programs or tax credits the better way to encourage work?

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two_parents_two_children_on_bridge_shutterstock

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Here are four ways in which the federal government could better make public policy support work and marriage.

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121214work

7-second takeaway

The share of jobless American men of prime working age has more than tripled since the late 1960s. Bold policy solutions are needed to confront the labor market challenges of automation and globalization.

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A woman walks past a "Now Hiring" sign as she leaves the Urban Outfitters store at Quincy Market in Boston, Massachusetts September 5, 2014. Reuters

7-second takeaway

Job growth is accelerating, but the labor market still faces challenges, including elevated numbers of long-term unemployed and discouraged workers.

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Image Credit: Photo Dean (Flickr) CC

7-second takeaway

People should go where the jobs are if they are living where the jobs are not. In particular, they should move to places where high levels of productivity and innovation result in strong wage growth. Here’s how to help make that happen.

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112514brookingsinflation

7-second takeaway

Many Republicans fret about inflation. But it’s the wrong kind of inflation that they are worrying about. The problem isn’t the government central bank’s “money printing,” but the government’s distortion and inefficient provision of important services. And it is addressing these cost-of-living issues that is at the core of the conservative reform movement. 

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Andrew McAfee

7-second takeaway

Manufacturing is becoming ever-more productive with fewer workers. And automation may create a similar phenomenon is many other sectors, too.

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worker_time_card_clocking_in_shutterstock_unemployment_1000x667

7-second takeaway

In order to (1) better understand why fewer men are working, and (2) understand how public policy can best attempt to reverse that trend, we simply need to know more than we know today about workers, potential workers, and the tasks firms want them to do.

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immigration_naturalization_ceremony_citizenship_shutterstock_1000x667

7-second takeaway

America always needs high-skilled immigrants. And we don’t need to tie them to an employer. Despite all the taxes and regulations, this is still a free enterprise system; let them make their own way.

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111714productivitypay

7-second takeaway

It’s disingenuous to close one eye and ignore America’s extraordinary employment growth relative to its peers, and claim that income inequality hurts the middle and working class.

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