Timeline: US involvement with Iraq and the broader Middle East

Timeline: US involvement with Iraq and the broader Middle East

March 19 marks the 10th anniversary of the American invasion of Iraq. But the U.S. conflict with Iraq began long before that. Iraq invaded Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and American forces were fighting Iraqis continuously for the 13 years that followed in order to enforce UN-mandated no-fly zones, punish Saddam Hussein for attempting to assassinate former President George H. W. Bush, and working to dismantle Saddam’s nuclear weapons program after he expelled UN inspectors in 1998. The decade between the 2003 invasion and today has been an important and traumatic time, but it was neither the start nor the finish of America’s involvement with Iraq and the broader Middle East.

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When potential adversaries see that America’s leaders are not afraid to use our military’s unmatched power to defend our interests, they may choose not to do things they otherwise might have done.

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“Tough Sell” is a critical contribution to the literature of what actually happened in Iraq and more broadly in the region during the post-invasion years.

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This AEI Events Podcast features a discussion between AEI Visiting Scholar Paul Wolfowitz and General (Ret.) David H. Petraeus on the critical role interpreters play in the US military.

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Bush did err by agreeing to withdraw but Clinton is wrong that the ultimate decision was not Obama’s. Obama campaigned on ending the war, and was insistent on pulling troops out no matter what.

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When US forces left, the last possibility of Iraq succeeding as a multi-ethnic, multi-confessional state left with them.

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America is not coming home from the Middle East. We will be there for a long time, in growing danger both there and at home, because of wars that its leaders neither avoided nor finished.

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The Obama-era “Iraq Syndrome” is proving more debilitating to the exercise of American leadership than “Vietnam Syndrome” was. Which candidate will fight for the past, as Reagan did, in order to win the future?

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“Neocon” has become code for suspiciously Hebraic super-hawk. That’s absurd and absurdly reductive. The right is having a long overdue, and valuable, argument about how to conduct foreign policy. Keep it going, just leave neoconservatism out of it.

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Why did the Mahdi Army collapse in 2008?

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The then-classified letter that was attached to a Hillary Clinton email is much ado about nothing.

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