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Venezuela

The short-run future of post-Hugo Chávez Venezuela is uncertain. With the chavista presidential candidate Nicolas Maduro claiming a razor-thin victory over his democratic opponent, the election result could produce a governability crisis in a country already wracked by political polarization, economic collapse, food shortages, power outages, and criminal violence. The international community — particularly in Washington — avoided confrontations with Chávez. However, failing to stand with democratic elements today could result in a missed opportunity to give the Venezuelan people a chance to recover their country and their future.

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Cuba's President Raul Castro (L) talks to his Venezuelan counterpart Nicolas Maduro during the opening ceremony of the ALBA-TCP Extraordinary Ebola summit in Havana October 20, 2014.  Reuters

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Latin American leaders have prioritized the interests of Cuba and Venezuela over their very own-risking the region’s image in the global marketplace.

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Image Credit: Dilma Rousseff, Wikimedia Commons

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Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff won a second four-year term yesterday, defeating challenger Aécio Neves by a slim margin.

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Image Credit: shutterstock

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Plummeting oil prices strain faltering Maduro regime in Venezuela.

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Image Credit:  Aécio Neves (Flickr) (CC-by-2.0)

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Recent polls and an important endorsement bode well for free-market advocate Aécio Neves against incumbent Rousseff in the Brazilian election.

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Representatives of Latin America and the Caribbean have chosen Venezuela to represent them in the U.N. Security Council (UNSC). Latin America’s nominee to debate matters of “peace and security” will be a country that is among the least peaceful and most insecure in the Americas.

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Image Credit: Fabio Rodrigues Pozzebom/ABr, Wikimedia Commons

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President Nicholas Maduro’s policies are deterring the world from investment and severely impacting economic opportunity for the people of Venezuela.

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The surge of undocumented children into the U.S. in recent months is only the latest reminder of the importance of a stable and prosperous Latin America — not just to Latin Americans themselves but to all of us here in the United States.

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Dozing U.S. diplomats let retired Venezuelan Major General Hugo Carvajal slip away this past weekend, but the fact that Caracas pulled out the stops to keep him from facing U.S. justice has exposed a regime with a very guilty conscience.

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Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro (R) speaks next to retired General Hugo Carvajal as they attends the Socialist Party congress in Caracas July 27, 2014. The former Venezuelan military intelligence head detained on the Caribbean island of Aruba over U.S accusations of drug-trafficking was released and flew home instead of being extradited to the United States, Carvajal, who ran military intelligence from 2004 to 2008 during the presidency of the late Hugo Chavez, flew home after the Netherlands government ruled he had diplomatic immunity, his lawyer and Venezuelan officials said.

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