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Yemen

Conditions in Yemen have changed with the onset of the Arab Spring. Political unrest has created openings for the country’s established opposition movements – including al Qaeda – to maneuver for power. Whether the Arab Spring has brought real regime change in Yemen is unclear. While the international community awaits a fully functional government in the capital of Sana’a, al Qaeda may continue to expand its safe haven in the south. Learn more about the challenges in Yemen.

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Iran’s IRGC released a letter expressing support for a Lebanese Hezbollah attack which killed two Israeli soldiers in the Shebaa Farms region on January 28 .

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Followers of the Shi'ite Houthi group wave their weapons as they gather at the group's camp near Sanaa September 10, 2014.

The Sana’a showdown is a sideshow to the slow-motion collapse of the entire Yemeni state. Cui bono? Al-Qaeda. Who loses? The United States of America.

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Followers of the Shi'ite Houthi group wave their weapons as they gather at the group's camp near Sanaa September 10, 2014.

As the Houthis allow themselves to become an Iranian proxy in Yemen, it is useful to consider the region’s other primary proxy—Lebanese Hezbollah—as a model for their behavior.

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ISIS has established a presence inside Yemen and engaged in at least one fight against its rivals from al Qaeda. If this escalates it could further destabilize the key US ally in the war on terror.

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A Houthi fighter fires at forces guarding the Presidential Palace during clashes in Sanaa January 19, 2015. A ceasefire has been agreed after a morning of artillery and gun battles between army troops and Houthi fighters in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on Monday, an official of the Shi'ite Muslim movement said. State television also reported a ceasefire.

The situation in Sana’a, Yemen’s capital, deteriorated very rapidly over the weekend and developments are still unfolding. The US military is on alert should US Embassy Sana’a require an evacuation, especially after an embassy vehicle was fired on yesterday.

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Yemen remains without a leader following the resignation of its president. Who will fill the power vacuum?

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The threat in Yemen is not just from al Qaeda, but that foreigners can go there to train to commit terrorist attacks.

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AQAP is using Yemen as a training ground for homegrown terrorism. While tightening border security is an option, it’s just a band-aid solution to a threat that needs to be addressed in those regions.

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Followers of the Shi'ite Houthi group wave their weapons as they gather at the group's camp near Sanaa September 10, 2014.

It’s time the US assesses how the al Houthis’ de-facto control of the Yemeni government affects our current strategy to combat AQAP.

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The killing of an American hostage in Yemen is increasing calls for the White House to change its strategy in dealing with terror groups in the Middle East. Relying on airstrikes and local ground forces to target the terrorist leadership have not been effective. Perhaps, it is time for the White House to change its approach.

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