Global effects of unorthodox monetary policies

Reuters

The Lehman Brothers building is pictured in New York September 15, 2008.

Article Highlights

  • Recent capital flows and currency movements have been particularly disruptive to the emerging-market economies.

    Tweet This

  • Unorthodox monetary policies have had a positive short-run impact on the industrialized countries and on the global economy.

    Tweet This

  • Maintaining or even increasing the pace of QE could accentuate the longer-run unintended consequences of unorthodox monetary policies.

    Tweet This

Subscribe to
The Ledger
Get AEI's weekly snapshot of economic news, views, and cues.

First Name:
Last Name:
Email:
Zip Code:

In the aftermath of the Great Recession, major central banks have scrambled to support economic recovery and to avoid deflation through highly accommodative and unorthodox monetary policy stances. Although relatively successful in the short term, these policies have given rise to incipient asset- and credit-market bubbles and to spillover effects on the emerging-market economies, which could threaten the longer-run world economic outlook. Going forward, these central banks need to be very much more mindful than they have been to date of the longer-term unintended consequences of their policy actions. 

Over the past five years, in the aftermath of the Great Recession, the Federal Reserve, European Central Bank (ECB), Bank of Japan (BOJ), and Bank of England (BOE) have pursued unorthodox monetary policies on an unprecedented scale. They have done so in an effort to stabilize their respective countries’ financial systems and to both support an economic recovery and to avoid a lapse into negative inflation. This has led to a massive expansion in these central banks’ balance sheets and has taken monetary policy into entirely uncharted waters. These effects raise basic concerns as to how these central banks can successfully exit from these policies.

There can be little question that unorthodox monetary policies were successful in stabilizing the major industrialized economies’ respective financial systems in the immediate aftermath of the September 2008 Lehman Brothers crisis. It would also seem that these policies have succeeded in providing welcome support to these economies’ recoveries by substantially lowering long-term interest rates and by increasing asset prices. 

However, they have come with a host of unintended consequences, including incipient asset- and credit-market bubbles, which both cloud the global economy’s longer-run economic outlook and raise questions as to whether the limits of these policies’ usefulness are now being reached. They have also had important spillover effects on other economies in general and on the emerging-market economies in particular that now pose a real risk to the global economic outlook.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Desmond
Lachman

What's new on AEI

How the Common Core went wrong
image Election countdown: The mood, measurements, and mechanics
image Rubio's defense speech: Fearless, informed, and refreshing
image Sorry Kerry, there is little role for Iran in fighting ISIS
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 22
    MON
  • 23
    TUE
  • 24
    WED
  • 25
    THU
  • 26
    FRI
Monday, September 22, 2014 | 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Policy implications of the new US labor market normal

We welcome you to join us as a panel of economists discuss US wage and price prospects in the coming months and the implications for the Federal Reserve’s current unorthodox monetary policy.

Friday, September 26, 2014 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
#ModiInUS: Can Modi’s visit to the White House put US-India relations back on track?

Tune in for this Google Hangout discussion with three leading experts about the implications of the Obama-Modi summit. Tweet your questions and comments to @AEI with #ModiInUS.

No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled today.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.