The Impact of Improved Detection Technology on Drug Quality: A Case Study of Lagos, Nigeria

Read this economic working paper as an Adobe Acrobat PDF

Nigeria is one of the few countries seriously affected by counterfeit drugs to have actively combated them. As part of this effort its regulatory agency, NAFDAC, has deployed handheld spectrometers to identify fake drugs in the market. In this Outlook, we analyze anti-malarial drug samples procured randomly from pharmacies in the largest city in Nigeria, the port of Lagos prior to and after the spectrometers were deployed. There is a statistically significant drop in the number of drugs failing quality control tests after the spectrometers were introduced, and a noticeable disparity in price between those passing and those failing tests as well. While it is not likely that the deployment of the spectrometers is the only reason for the improvement in drug quality, and the segmentation of the market, it is surely a major factor.

Roger Bate is the Legatum Fellow in Global Prosperity at AEI. Aparna Mathur is a resident scholar at AEI.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Roger
Bate

 

Aparna
Mathur

What's new on AEI

We still don't know how many people Obamacare enrolled
image The war on invisible poverty
image Cutting fat from the budget
image Speaker of the House John Boehner on resetting America’s economic foundation
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 22
    MON
  • 23
    TUE
  • 24
    WED
  • 25
    THU
  • 26
    FRI
Monday, September 22, 2014 | 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Policy implications of the new US labor market normal

We welcome you to join us as a panel of economists discuss US wage and price prospects in the coming months and the implications for the Federal Reserve’s current unorthodox monetary policy.

No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled today.
No events scheduled this day.