Energy and the Environment

Share Mark as favorite

President Barack Obama delivers his State of the Union address in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 25, 2011.

We have gathered here the opinions of several AEI experts on what they think the president should cover in his speech, as well as what we might expect him to actually say. They look at education issues, America’s foreign and defense strategies, health care, the US economy, and more.

Share Mark as favorite

Activists hold a rally against government approval of the planned Keystone XL oil pipeline, in front of the White House in Washington January 10, 2015. The pipeline cleared two hurdles on Friday, setting up a showdown between Congress and President Barack Obama who has raised new questions about the project after more than six years of review. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

With respect to climate change, Keystone XL would transport 830,000 barrels per day of Canadian crude oil, the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from which would be 147-159 million metric tons per year on a lifecycle basis. In the extreme case in which the oil does not displace any other crude oil production elsewhere in the world, the increase in GHG emissions would be about 0.4 percent of the world total.

Share Mark as favorite

Climate advocates and representatives from the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota protest against the Keystone XL pipeline in front of U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu's home (D-LA), the chair of the Senate Energy Committee, in Washington November 17, 2014. Reuters

The opposition to Keystone XL is one manifestation of the essential anti-human core of modern environmentalism that has become more prominent in the Democratic Party.

Share Mark as favorite

Image Credit: By Josh Lopez (CC BY 2.0), Wikimedia Commons

Despite concerns of environmentalists, Americans solidly support building the pipeline.

Share Mark as favorite

Feat_SMILOilL_500x283

Falling oil prices have been called shocking, unprecedented, and (most incredibly) a highly regrettable development that will end the rise of American stock market and create unrest and uncertainty around the world. However, what we are experiencing is the eighth oil price decline of more than 30 percent during the past 30 years.

Share Mark as favorite

gloved_hand_holds_vile_with_carbon_emmissions_shutterstock

Should we take the US-China climate deal seriously? New data of US and Chinese carbon emissions estimate Chinese emissions are now 95% higher than American.

Share Mark as favorite

Electric Grid

The conclusion that we need to harden the grid immediately is about as clear as anything can be, as a matter of elementary risk analysis. Yet our decision processes have become so sclerotic that we are unable to deal with this very clear mortal threat, and now we have put ourselves in a terrible strategic posture.

Share Mark as favorite

U.S. President Barack Obama (L) and Chinese President Xi Jinping toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing November 12, 2014.  Reuters

Any agreement between developed and developing nations over climate change transfer payments is unlikely to be put into practice due to high economic costs.

Share Mark as favorite

honey_bee_comb_farm_shutterstock_1000x667

Hyperbole, scientists say, obscures the complex story of what’s really happening to bees and why—and the risks that advocacy groups and activist journalists risk of driving science and agricultural regulations into a policy ditch.

Share Mark as favorite

honey_bee_pollen_flower_shutterstock_1000x667

Reports that honey bees are dying in unusually high numbers has concerned many scientists, farmers and beekeepers, and  gripped the public.

Open
Refine Content