Foreign and Defense Policy

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It is good that Netanyahu is coming to Washington, and House Republicans deserve credit for inviting him.

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Everyone has something to say about President Obama’s State of the Union address delivered last Tuesday night. Given in the shadow of a major shellacking in the November 2014 election, Obama’s tone was more divisive than not, touting perceived “victories” and glossing over major problems, particularly in the realm of international affairs.

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Rather than blunt sectarianism and repression with reforms, the House of Saud has decided to double down on repression.

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Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan

If Mr. Erdoğan truly wants to know why Turkey’s European Union membership has gone nowhere, perhaps he might consider what everyone besides him realizes.

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Isolation is an impossibility in a globalized world, and calls for it to turn inward will only lead to a marginalized Japan.

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Here’s an opportunity for President Obama to leave behind a relationship with India that is stronger than the one he inherited.

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With new laws passed by the Obama administration “normalizing” our relationship with Cuba what will change for the people of Cuba?

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With the 2016 presidential election approaching, tensions among presidential candidates are heating up. Will the new president be a Washington outsider or not, we expect changes to be brought to Washington.

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House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry, R-TX, discusses a congressional roadmap for rebuilding the nation's military capabilities at AEI on Jan. 20, 2015.

The head of the British defense staff, General Sir Nick Houghton, said last month that the world is becoming a more dangerous, less certain, less predictable, and more unstable place. The dangers are swirling around out there, what Macaulay called the red whirlwind, and Americans and American interests are, inevitably, swept up into it.

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After a shaky stretch, Washington and Delhi have a window to pivot the partnership beyond just arms traders. These old democratic friends need a seamless, strategic partnership

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