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Covering a defense story today? Here’s the latest from the experts on the AEI defense team.

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Former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden appears live via video during a student organized world affairs conference at the Upper Canada College private high school in Toronto, February 2, 2015.  Reuters

The federal government’s handling of the legal and political issues surrounding NSA meta-data collection has not been a pretty picture. Somewhere in Russia, Edward Snowden is probably smiling.

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In a recent interview, former Deputy Director of the CIA Michael Morell stated that, in regards to the 2011 attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, it became the most politicized national security issue he had ever experienced.

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Allowing the Patriot Act to expire would disarm our nation at a time when foreign threats are on the rise and attacks in the U.S. are in the offing.

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A federal appeals court has ruled that a U.S. spy program that collects phone records of millions of Americans is illegal, something that now will make Congress have to decide if the anti-terrorism surveillance should be shut down or replaced.

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Under considerable controversy, the French Parliament recently passed a new domestic surveillance bill that will potentially give law enforcement officials their most widespread spying abilities ever, involving practically no judicial oversight.

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A man is seen near cyber code and the U.S. National Security Agency logo in this photo illustration taken in Sarajevo March 11, 2015.  Reuters

The NSA programs that Congress is considering re-authorizing have played a vital role in protecting America from the still-metastasizing terrorist threat.

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By naming three covert CIA officers in a recent article, The New York Times unnecessarily endangers them and their families. Although it may not have broken the law, the paper had no justification for doing so, even by the lax canons of today’s journalism.

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Last week, AEI’s Critical Threats Project in partnership with Norse Corporation released, “The growing cyberthreat from Iran: The initial report of Project Pistachio Harvest.” For the praise, thank you to all the insightful readers who appreciated the work and the information.  For the more serious critiques, some clarity.

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