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Given Japan’s importance to Asia’s future path, the following are some of the top questions every presidential candidate should be asked.

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is the first leader perhaps in modern Japanese history to take seriously the gender imbalance in the labor force, and to try and do something about it.

 

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If it is more than a slogan, the new economic normal can help the Chinese economy escape the middle-income trap. But the hard reforms must start now.

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Shale development may be the key to the US remaining the sole superpower for the next two generations. AEI Resident Scholar Derek Scissors explains the United States’ unique energy opportunities, the major challenges facing our adversaries, as well as the potential threats to the US energy market.

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Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe delivers his policy speech at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo February 12, 2015. Abe and his economic ministers piled pressure on companies on Thursday to raise wages to sustain growth as the economy climbs out of a recession triggered by a sales tax increase last year. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Abe’s drive to increase women in the workforce runs up against the need for higher birthrates.

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With Washington caught in a dialogue dependency trap, unable to think outside the box and hoping against all experience for an outcome different from last time, expect more evasion and bad faith agreements in the future.

 

 

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The creation of new islands in the South China Sea playing host to Chinese military forces will create new challenges for military planners in the sea’s littoral states as well as, potentially, in India, Australia, and the United States.

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Both the United States and China could drive global net energy demand, and they are the world’s central geopolitical actors. The Middle East, European Union, and Russia matter, but just how important they are will depend to a great degree on American and Chinese behavior.

 

 

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China has abundant shale reserves, yet it lacks most of the other requirements of a successful shale revolution.

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Chinese leaders have been pursuing a ‘hundred-year marathon,’ patiently trudging toward a goal of replacing the United States as the world’s dominant power by 2049.

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