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With new laws passed by the Obama administration “normalizing” our relationship with Cuba what will change for the people of Cuba?

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A government supporter who is against a protest by the Ladies in White (not pictured), a group made up of female family members of imprisoned dissidents, holds a Cuba flag in Havana December 10, 2014 Cuban police detained several activists during peaceful demonstrations at a popular Havana square on Wednesday, an annual protest on International Human Rights Day. REUTERS/Enrique De La Osa

Although President Obama’s new approach is being touted as an historic shift in U.S.-Cuba relations, all of the measures implemented thus far, serve to reinforce the status quo—legitimizing and benefiting a regime that has a 55-year track record of opposing change.

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Touted as a historic shift in US-Cuba relations, ironically, the Obama administration’s latest initiatives serve to reinforce the status quo — legitimizing and benefiting a regime that has a 55-year track record of opposing change.

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President Nicholas Maduro faces popular unrest at home, as plummeting oil prices and failed economic policies have left Venezuela on the verge of economic collapse.

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President Barack Obama boards Marine One at Joint Base Andrews, Md., en route to the White House following a trip to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, N.J., Dec. 15, 2014. WhiteHouse.gov

For the last six years, and almost certainly the next two, the biggest news is Barack Obama’s systematic unwillingness to advance U.S. national-security interests around the world.

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There is one group that is not impressed with Obama’s rapprochement with the totalitarian regime in Havana — the dissidents on the island who are risking their lives for democracy and human rights.

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With the announcement of a major US policy shift in Cuba, many are wondering how this renewed connection will manifest itself.

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Despite Obama’s opening to Cuba, expect no meaningful steps toward liberalization of any kind from the Castro regime.

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Cuba's President Raul Castro gestures after delivering a speech to members of the National Assembly in Havana, December 20, 2014. Stepping out of his legendary brother's shadow, President Raul Castro has scored a diplomatic triumph and a surge in popular support with the deal that ends decades of open hostility with the United States. Reuters

With regard to Cuba, the current debate is mostly over the best means for ending a Communist dictatorship, and how to bring political and economic freedom to the island. It’s a nice change to have everyone aiming for the same goal this time.

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The president has made a dangerous bet by normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba.

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