Latin America

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Colombia must not sacrifice crucial anti-drug programs to achieve peace with FARC rebels.

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A demonstrator holds a sign during a protest against Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff at Paulista avenue in Sao Paulo April 12, 2015. Reuters

Brazil’s economic malaise and corruption scandals challenge President Dilma Rousseff’s ability to govern. The US and Brazil must improve their commercial and diplomatic relations to bolster economic development in a region crucial to both countries.

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Covering a defense story today? Here’s the latest from the experts on the AEI defense team.

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President Obama’s decision to remove Cuba from the list of state sponsors of terrorism was more political than technical, but nevertheless clearly demonstrates his foreign policy gullibility.

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In an effort to try and neutralize U.S. relations with Cuba, President Obama has decided to remove Cuba from the state terrorism list, a decision being met with considerable skepticism and critique.

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The recent meeting between President Obama and Raul Castro has been met with considerable criticism in the U.S., and many wonder just what there is to gain in reaching a potential deal.

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During the recent Summit of the Americas, President Obama sat down with the president of Cuba, Raul Castro, signifying the first meeting of the country’s leaders in over 50 years. The event did not go by without criticism, however, and further decisions to neutralize relations are met with opposition back in the U.S.

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President Barack Obama (C) talks with Chile's President Sebastian Pinera (L) and Guatemala's President Otto Perez (R) as Mexico's President Felipe Calderon (L, upper row) and Panama's President Ricardo Martinelli (R, upper row) stand near before a group photo at the Americas Summit in Cartagena, April 15, 2012. Reuters

It’s not too late for Obama to recognize that his serious counterparts in Latin America don’t need a pal, they need a partner.

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About 8.5 million of the 11-plus million unauthorized immigrants living in the US are in the workforce, accounting for about 5 percent of all workers. Almost none of them want to be unauthorized—they either have no way to attain legal status, or the pathway to legal status is so onerous that they believe they are better off remaining unauthorized.

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