Politics and Public Opinion

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Davy Crockett’s decidedly frank “Speech on Electioneering” can still be enjoyed for its irreverent treatment of political imaging.

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The prevailing assumption is that Republicans will take the Senate in the midterm elections on Nov. 4. It would be a surprise if they didn’t. But not a huge surprise.

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Will Republicans gain the Senate majority this election? With only days remaining before Election Day, that question is the elephant (or donkey, one might speculate) in the room.

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Evil requires the ability to choose good. Absent choice, evil isn’t evil, it’s just stuff that happens.

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The permanent campaign is a permanent fixture of our politics. Like the candidates, the pollsters will be judged by who wins and loses – on Election Day 2016.

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If you’re not a journalist, here’s a trade secret: the person who wrote an article often isn’t the same person who wrote the headline.

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Senator Mark Udall (D-CO), October 25, 2014  | Reuters

Democrats aren’t talking much about foreign policy, a positive issue for the president in his first term. And you aren’t seeing any Democrats in serious Senate races inviting Obama in for campaign rallies.

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The prevailing assumption is that Republicans will take the Senate in the midterm elections on Nov. 4. It would be a surprise if they didn’t. But not a huge surprise.

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The Harvard Institute of Politics poll shows that Obama’s job approval among millennials has fallen from 47 percent in April to 43 percent today.

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The midterm race and generic ballot may be tightening. The general public is disappointed in both parties, and is looking for change. The majority of Americans are dissatisfied or angry about the way that the federal government is working.

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