Elections

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Former U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton speaks at the U.S. Agency for International Development at "Cookstoves Future" summit in New York, November 21, 2014. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Hillary Clinton is blatantly transactional in her fundraising and policy making. And she wants to be president.

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The States of Change: Demographics and Democracy project offers a preview of how the United States might look in 2060.

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Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has emerged as the leader of the GOP pack in the important caucus state of Iowa, according to a recent poll. Nevertheless, it is still early in the race for the 2016 election, and questions of whether he can keep the momentum going remains.

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Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker talks with other governors before the arrival of U.S. President Barack Obama to address the National Governors Association at the White House in Washington February 23, 2015.
REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Much of our political media has set aside its job of informing the public, and instead they have dedicated their column inches to telling Walker that he’s not playing their media game well enough.

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Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks on "Smart Power: Security Through Inclusive Leadership" at Georgetown University in Washington December 3, 2014. The event was hosted by the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security and the Institute for Inclusive Security. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Hillary Clinton is facing an identity crisis. Hillary 5.0 will need a brand like any product which many will buy into, but the one constant will be a purpose defined by the pursuit of power.

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What does demographic change in America mean for the 2016 presidential election, the Democratic and Republican parties, and the future of public policy? The States of Change: Demographics and Democracy-project seeks to analyze national and state-specific demographic change since 1974 and project how it will change through 2060.

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AEI, the Center for American Progress, and the Brookings Institution present the findings of their States of Change: Demographics and Democracy project and lead discussions with some of America’s foremost political analysts.

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The States of Change: Demographics and Democracy project is a bipartisan collaboration that documents and analyzes demographic change in America.

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Immigration is supposed to be a bitterly divisive topic for Republicans. Yet a very narrow range of opinion separates the party’s leading presidential candidates, which is unfortunate for the country.

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Covering a political story today? Here’s the latest from AEI’s political corner experts.

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Do Republicans have a realistic chance to win the next presidential election? Some analysts suggest the answer is no. They argue that there is a 240-electoral-vote “blue wall” of 18 states and D.C. that have gone Democratic in the last six presidential elections.

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