Poverty Studies

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Research suggests that child poverty would be markedly lower in the United States if more American parents were stably married.

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Child poverty-fighting efforts should be focused on two outcomes simultaneously: the prevalence of material hardship among children, and whether children are growing up in households where their parents are earning their own success through employment.

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The best opportunity to reduce child poverty rapidly is to divert money from the construction of new tax credit projects to the housing voucher program.

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On this week’s episode of Banter, Brad Wilcox, Wendy Wang, and Ian Rowe discuss millennial success and the ‘success sequence.’

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In this AEI Events Podcast, Wendy Wang and W. Bradford Wilcox presented their new report, “The millennial success sequence: Marriage, kids, and the ‘success sequence’ among young adults.”

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Join AEI for a discussion of a new report by W. Bradford Wilcox and Wendy Wang showing how millennials who follow the “success sequence” — completing high school, getting a job, and marrying before having a child — are more likely to steer clear of poverty and into the middle class.

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The rise of nontraditional routes into parenthood among Millennials is one indicator that today’s young adults are taking increasingly divergent paths toward adulthood, including family formation.

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Lawmakers on both sides are unlikely to support cuts that fall almost exclusively on the poor, even with the apparent trade-off in defense spending increases and tax cuts. Nonetheless, a few aspects related to safety net programs are worthy of consideration as Congress moves forward with a budget.

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Work requirements for those receiving welfare are a critical tool to help rescue our fellow Americans from the misery of idleness – so they can achieve meaning and happiness in their lives through the power of honest, productive work.

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Robert Doar reports to the Virginia General Assembly’s Commission on Economic Opportunity for Virginians in Aspiring and Diverse Communities on three keys to reducing poverty and expanding opportunity.

 

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The soon-to-be-released 2018 White House budget includes more than $1 trillion in cuts to major social and entitlement programs including Medicaid, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), agriculture subsidies, and federal student aid while calling for spending increases in infrastructure, defense, and a new paid parental leave program. AEI scholars are available to comment on the various aspects of the budget.

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