Poverty Studies

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Wealthy kids enjoy the many benefits of stable families who invest in their development, whereas poor and working-class kids increasingly navigate broken families, the absence of adult role models, and fewer opportunities for well-paying jobs. During this event, panelists discuss whether this snapshot is correct and what to do about it.

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Join five contributors to “The State of the American Mind” (Templeton Press, June 2015) for a panel discussion on life in America, how our collective mind is faring, and what is yet to come.

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Jack P. Shonkoff, director of the Center of the Developing Child at Harvard University, and AEI’s Robert Doar and Katharine Stevens discuss the science of early learning and how it can be harnessed to improve opportunity for disadvantaged children.

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When Harvard social scientist and celebrated author Robert Putnam lists the challenges facing poor Americans, family structure is always at the top.

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The extent to which we can limit the burden on staff and on families by better consolidating and coordinating food assistance programs, the better these families will be served and the better the government’s money will be spent.

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Judging by the views expressed by some of the nation’s leading family scholars, marriage’s days in America are numbered. Recent data may suggest otherwise.

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Federal Spending on Means-Tested Programs

Spending on poor families has increased dramatically over the past few decades.

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Increasing work and work supports and improving high-school graduation rates are better alternatives to Mayor  de Blasio’s antipoverty plan.

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Our nation’s food assistance programs are largely adequate to address very low food security and do so for the vast majority of households. However, fluctuations in income that result from work disruptions or other causes increase the likelihood of very low food security.

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AEI President Arthur Brooks will participate in a discussion with President Barack Obama and Robert Putnam at the Catholic-Evangelical Leadership Summit on Overcoming Poverty at Georgetown University.

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Research, such as Dr. Edin’s, demonstrate that there are many low-income men of color who embrace fatherhood and want to support their children. At the same time, many display destructive behaviors, especially when they form new relationships.

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Thirty-year-old David Coulombe (behind banner), who works as a consumables sales floor associate at Walmart, participates in a march and rally for $15 minimum wage in Boston, Massachusetts April 14, 2015.  Reuters

There is a real risk that higher minimum wages will lead to fewer jobs for low-skilled workers. To avoid these disemployment risks, policymakers should instead rely on the Earned Income Tax Credit to provide income support to low-wage workers.

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A panel of distinguished experts discuss the role of economics, policy, and culture in the struggles of black men in the United States, and how their prospects can be improved.

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Across many government-provided programs, provider and individual data (even if it has no personally identifying information) is restricted from public view. Not only is this bad from a transparency perspective, but it limits the ability of researchers to assess the effectiveness of government programs.

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