Poverty

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America’s churches have grown weakest in some of the communities that need them most: poor and working-class communities across the country.

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The topic of how to try and end poverty in the United States is one that has gone unnoticed within the GOP for many years. Or rather, that is how it was until AEI president Arthur Brooks started addressing the issue, with the result of practically all Republican presidential candidates looking into what the answer might be.

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We need an educational system that brings children, with all combinations of assets and deficits, to adulthood having identified things they enjoy doing and having learned how to do them well.

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Covering a story about society and culture? Here’s the latest from AEI’s Society and Culture experts.

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The federal government spent $65.2 billion on the EITC in FY 2014, of which 27.2% or $17.7 billion were improper.

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W. Bradford Wilcox reviews Robert Putnam’s new book, “Our Kids,” in which Putnam argues that children’s access to the core institutions that foster their development—strong families, strong schools, strong communities—is increasingly separate and unequal.

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With little public attention, the Obama administration has been changing America’s child-support enforcement. The most recent Census Bureau report found that in 2011 fewer than 50% of single mothers had child-support orders—down from almost 60% in 2003.

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Why will the disability insurance program become insolvent next year?

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Can the American Enterprise Institute’s Arthur Brooks change the way Republicans talk about poverty? Listen closely and Republicans have begun to talk about poverty, an issue that has largely been dormant for at least two decades in GOP political circles.

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Republicans have begun to talk about poverty, an issue that has largely been dormant for at least two decades in GOP political circles. The intellectual muscle behind Its quiet resurgence is largely attributed to one person: Arthur Brooks. He has the ear of every potential Republican presidential candidate and is trying to change the way the party thinks about poverty and poor people.

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