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Discussion: (9 comments)

  1. Arthur O. armstrong

    Please explain the difference between ExIm, currently in the news as a cesspool of corruption, which the AEI supports, and tax credits for movie production which the AEI opposes.

  2. In fiscal 2013 the bank authorized $6.9 billion in direct loans. The three biggest totaled $3.9 billion and were to BG Energy, Reliance Industries and Global Foundries. The suppliers were Bechtel, Flour, Conoco Philips and Applied Materials.

    To suggest any of these parties need help with financing is deceptive as it is deceptive to suggest the Bank’s main business is helping small vendors export.

    The bank is corporate welfare for big business and it should be shut down.

    http://bipartisansoapbox.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-recipients-of-ex-im-bank-largesse.html

  3. Ali Bertarian

    O.K. Mr. Donnelly, the ball is in your court. Until you can come up with a viable response to Mr. Armstrong’s and WP Knabe’s replies, I will have to side with them.

  4. Thomas Donnelly

    Here’s the point: government-backed loans that aid America’s front-line allies are qualitatively different than helping them stay current in popular culture. Movies are more likely to lead to license than protect liberty. All subsidies are not created equal.

    1. I was hoping for a more detailed and poignant response as I will fully admit I don’t know much about the IM Bank and it’s functions but. Topically it seems like an idea whose time has passed and needs to be shut down. If you’re suggesting to keep it around and limit the function to just arms sales and boosting up foreign allies I could maybe climb on board but you don’t state that in your article. Nor did you address the inbred corruption that we are only now just hearing about and will continue to prosper without sever restraints.

  5. Arthur O. armstrong

    Surely you jest. Are your seriously suggesting that Boeing’s selling a Dreamliner to a Japanese airline, ANA, is an aid to “a front line ally.” I didn’t realize the Dreamliner was a war plane. I thought it was a flying movie theater, which offers its passengers a view of those movies that “lead to license.” And Delta Delta Airlines, an American carrier, which doesn’t get the benefit of the guarantee, doesn’t think much of Ex-Im either. Delta has to be more “front line” than ANA

  6. Arthur O. armstrong

    Surely you jest. Are your seriously suggesting that Boeing’s selling a Dreamliner to a Japanese airline, ANA, is an aid to “a front line ally.” I didn’t realize the Dreamliner was a war plane. I thought it was a flying movie theater, which offers its passengers a view of those movies that “lead to license.” And Delta Airlines, an American carrier, which doesn’t get the benefit of the guarantee, doesn’t think much of Ex-Im either. Delta has to be more “front line” than ANA

  7. Donald Sivori

    Mr. Donnelly, you present a fair argument for improving and expanding FMS-DELG. But I don’t see anything in your reasoning that warrants support for Ex-Im. Arms sales to allies may thwart enemies and may advance the security of the US. But it doesn’t follow that liberty is in anyway protected. History shows that many allies are no friends of liberty.

  8. Sohail Malik

    That’s pretty high-larious, I’d say. This Donnelly fella’s sarcasm is so out-there that none of the commentators get it- its a joke- a joke, fer cryin out loud. C’mon folks – just cause we’re conservative or libertarian, doesn’t mean we can’t have a good laugh ;}
    (Idi Amin woulda loved this!)

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