AEIdeas

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Discussion: (13 comments)

  1. Jon Murphy

    It’s like the South Park episode of Sarcastiball! You make a sarcastic comment and somebody decides it’s a good idea…

  2. Walt Greenway

    As an instructor who has automated students’ grading, I don’t miss arguing about grades a bit. I don’t even know what their grade is until I look at it and enter it through a link the last day of class because it is the students’ job to acknowledge their grade weekly in an uploaded summary. Students can get their grade at any time on their phone or computer.

    I think any narrative about ‘giving” grades is wrong by design. Students earn grades by completing assignments and turning them in on time and any late penalty is programmed into the automatic gradebook with a date and time stamp. Turning in an assignment late is just like coming into work late: you don’t get your full pay.

  3. Walt Greenway

    If my college does this, I will have to get information about a gender and/or race code I don’t currently get, and the percentage of grade premium to program into the gradebook for each code (you can’t tell this online and because of our multicultural students, I often don’t know even when I see them in person). And, of course, all of the students would need to be notified about the grading process because it is a posted and transparent policy.

    I wonder how colleges would handle the current widespread policy of self-declaration of race? (colleges are only allowed to decide undeclared gender of male or female at this time for federal reporting)

    1. Aiken_Bob

      I like it — as a freshman you self declare yourself a victim (minority) that gets you the most free stuff and higher grades. When you graduate with your way to high gpa you self declare you are white and straight. What a system.
      Sounds kinda like the current senator from Mass.

  4. morganovich

    what’s amazing here is that this actually sounds like a new form of jim crow: separate grading system, equal grades.

    of course, it will not look like that in real life, will it?

    if you were an employer and you knew this was going on, why would you take the grades of a basque-Cherokee student seriously?

    you’d tend to discount their degree and gpa as less impressive than a similar one from a white or asian student.

    suddenly, even having the same degree and same grades is not parity.

    how are talented minorities even supposed to prove themselves under such a system?

    even if they do the same work and would have earned the same grade, they no longer get full credit for it.

    this is yet another program that does real damage to those it purports to help.

    1. Aiken_Bob

      It is interesting that we have come full circle on this. One of the big pushes for colleges was supreme court ruling that employers could not give IQ type tests because of potential discrimination. A college degree became a proxy for having a certain level of knowledge.
      Now because of grade inflation and this sort madness with minorities grades — employers are starting to give IQ type tests again.
      I wish do-gooder would just go away!

    2. Seattle Sam

      I had a black co-worker tell me that he would never choose a black doctor under the age of 50.

  5. UWM and the rest of the big liberal schools have moved ever closer to grade equality over the years through grade inflation. The disadvantaged have already been covered over through that ploy.

    Folks over at Minding The Campus suggest that the time has arrived for the Handicapper General, Diana Moon Glampers.

  6. Citizen Buddy

    “It calls for “proportional participation of historically underrepresented racial-ethnic groups at all levels of an institution, including high status special programs, high-demand majors, and in the distribution of grades.”

    The people illegally swarming over the southern U.S. border certainly are broadly diverse, underrepresented racial-ethnic groups. The growing proportions will make an interesting set-aside of grades at the top of the curve.

  7. Walt Greenway

    “Let us take a closer look at one of these working definitions included, namely “representational equity.”

    It calls for “proportional participation of historically underrepresented racial-ethnic groups at all levels of an institution, including high status special programs, high-demand majors, and in the distribution of grades.”

    I can’t find the terms “representational equity” “distribution” “grade” or “grades” performing a search of the Framework for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence PDF report. Where did the quotation above come from? I was looking for context for that remark and struck out. Maybe the terms are somewhere else not referenced or maybe my PDF “Find” function does not work?

    1. It’s not in the document linked to in the article, but is mentioned here.

      1. Walt Greenway

        Thanks for the link. I don’t know the race of some of my students even if the college ordered me to increase grades for them, but that does not mean that can’t happen administratively because I don’t see students’ official college records in my capacity (I don’t know for sure the student I put in for a C actually gets a C, a B, or an A.). My gradebook is electronic, and the dean, me, and the student knows any student’s current grade any time we want to check it.

  8. givemefreedom

    so first the do gooders push for racial diversity in universities using race based admissions. As a result we have a lot of blacks and hispanics in these universities who would not have been admitted soley on their grades in high school.

    Now the inevitable happens and these students are achieving lower grades than the students who did not get the preferential race treatment so the do gooders are pushing for “proportional participation of historically underrepresented racial-ethnic groups at all levels of an institution, including high status special programs, high-demand majors, and in the distribution of grades.”

    makes sense to me………..

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