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Discussion: (6 comments)

  1. I would’ve thought that the actual cost of Boston’s big dig should’ve been all the lesson taxpayers needed to approach infrastructure spending with a skeptical eye…

  2. In addition to the cost overrun, I suspect that very few of the mass transit projects ever achieved the level of ridership/revenue that was factored into the ‘no-brainer’ decision to proceed with the project, resulting in the double whammy of more money, fewer riders.

  3. Third Way already has noticed the real reason why even if the public di want more public investment for infrastructure, etc. we are not likley to get it. (http://content.thirdway.org/publications/564/Third_Way_Report_-_Collision_Course_Why_Democrats_Must_Back_Entitlement_Reform.) Long story short: we have been spending most of the money maintaining (and even “stimulating”) consumption.

  4. Max Planck

    “2. Democrats must strongly support continued reforms, including those that ensure that projects are awarded for economic reasons, not constituent reasons.”

    Right, Jim. AS WE ALL KNOW, THIS NEVER HAPPENS WHEN REPUBLICAN CONGRESSMEN SEND MONEY TO THEIR DISTRICS FOR THEIR PROJECTS.

    Do you have ANY shame? You’ve become a parody of yourself.

    1. RonRonDoRon

      That was a quote from Third Way, not a comment by Pethokoukis.

      1. Max Planck

        Jimmy should have said

        “Retweets do not constitute endorsements.”

        Whoever said, it’s frikkin’ lame. There are no “fiscal conservatives.”

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