AEIdeas

The public policy blog of the American Enterprise Institute

Subscribe to the blog

Discussion: (11 comments)

  1. Certainly agree with the subjectivity issue. As soon as evaluation gets subjective the abuses are inevitable. From my experience in life – too often shamelessly so!

    As for the presumed (not Dr Murray’s) motivational base of the typical Asian student, the question remains as to whether there is any truth in that ‘supposed’ intellectual redundancy and parental pressure. There is a world of psychology behind “hard-working/high-achieving”. Maybe it should be looked at?

    I have an Indian friend who use to teach computer studies in Fiji. He told me how frustrated he was with his students “always going for the hundred”. The result, and I (crudely) quote him, is it was all rote and no understanding with the result that they forget everything after scoring their beloved high test scores. He later stressed to his students to stop going for the hundred, and to just focus on understanding. And as he claimed, with excellent (real) results and far more interest and pleasure from his students.

    Maybe some of those Asians and Indians just need to get their maybe over-simplistic “3rd-world mentality” parents off their backs, so as to let their real talent breathe?

  2. Certainly agree with the subjectivity issue. As soon as evaluation gets subjective the abuses are inevitable. From my experience in life – too often shamelessly so!

    As for the presumed (and not Dr Murray’s, I know) motivational base of the typical Asian student, the question remains as to whether there is any truth in that ‘supposed’ intellectual redundancy and parental pressure. There is a world of psychology behind “hard-working/high-achieving”. Maybe it should be looked at?

    I have an Indian friend who use to teach computer studies in Fiji. He told me how frustrated he was with his students “always going for the hundred”. The result, and I (crudely) quote him, is it was all rote and no understanding with the result that they forgot everything after scoring their beloved high test scores. He later stressed to his students to stop going for the hundred, and to just focus on understanding. And as he claimed, with excellent (real) results and far more interest and pleasure from his students.

    Maybe some of those Asians and Indians just need to get their…dare I say it…maybe over-simplistic third-world-mentality parents off their backs, so as to let their real talent breathe?

  3. Michael R

    It’s an interesting scenario because it is very true. I TA’d a political science course discussion section not long ago, and I had one student from Taiwan who was undoubtedly the smartest student in the room (keep in mind, this was someone who lived on the other side of the Pacific Ocean and performed the best in a course about American politics) but she said nothing nearly the entire semester. I’d email her to encourage her to contribute to discussion, and even threatened to mark her participation grade down if she didn’t (as I was well within my right to do), but she never said anything.

    For all that has been made of online degrees and the like, and there is true value to them, there is something indelible about the contributions of a student to a seminar or discussion group or even the campus as a whole. If an admissions officer determines that a student may be brilliant, but not fit for that college’s environment, I think it’s for the benefit of everyone.

    1. You are speaking about an international student, while the article is about Asian-Americans.

      If the difference is not clear to you, here it is: one is a non-native English speaker, grown up in a educational system that – as far as I can tell – is focused mostly on absorbing information rather than on participating and discussing it; Asian-Americans are native-English speakers who were educated in the US.

      In fact, my experience as TA for political classes is that Asian-Americans, while maybe on average shier than whites, still contribute significantly to the discussion.

  4. FranInAtlanta

    And, if you are an Asian-American parent, you know this and make sure your kid has higher achievement than you might push otherwise – so the effect of higher GPA and activities is even higher.

  5. Immigrant from former USSR

    Not in USA, but in China properly:
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2012/06/chinese-cheating.html
    Why China, with their gross amount of US dollar reserves, does not directly subsidize US Universities?
    E.g. University of California Berkeley,with its in-state tuintion.

  6. Seeing that 72% of Asian Americans voted Democrat in the last election, they better not be complaining. That’s what you get when you vote for the pro-Affirmative Action party

    1. Therapsid

      How does the voting behavior of some percentage of a racial group, even a decisive majority of it, constitute an excuse for discriminating against *individuals*?

    2. Didacticus

      Except it is the STATE elite universities that have far higher percentages of Asians than PRIVATE Ivy and Stanford.

      But hey, if you’re the product of American education, basic facts and logic hardly matter to you — it’s all about feelings and opinions.

  7. Mr. Murray, thank you for your decency to speak up on behalf of disadvantaged Asian American students in this country. The race-conscious preference in college admissions is dead wrong – we are telling our kids that race does matter and some races have to work harder to gain the equal footings than other races. The only way to promote equality is to promote equality, not promote discriminatory policy, such as the AA in college admissions.

  8. It’s “just discrimination against hard-working, high-achieving young people because of the color of their skin.”

    Asians have been screaming for years about this stuff but it’s systemically supressed by the mainstream media. Proof?

    http://www.blogdenovo.org/archives/001600.html

    http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/publications/supreme_court_preview/briefs-v2/12-682_pet_amcu_aalf.authcheckdam.pdf

    http://sblog.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/11-345-tsac-AsianAmericanLegalFoundation.pdf

    The mere fact that lazy journalists don’t do their research does not mean Asians haven’t been screaming about this for years. But in space – and in liberal circles – no one can hear you scream

Comments are closed.

Sort By:

Refine Content:

Scholar

Additional Keywords:

Refine Results

or to save searches.

Open
Refine Content