AEIdeas

The public policy blog of the American Enterprise Institute

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Discussion: (29 comments)

  1. morganovich

    well, given their history, i suppose the french should be grateful the taxi drivers are not parking their cars on the highway and refusing to move until they get a subsidy.

  2. ha ha ha.. yes I saw this and yes I will AGREE that the French are way, way further left than anything we know or see in the US.

    I would guess that a libertarian in France is a rare critter indeed!

    ;-)

    1. morganovich

      with a shrinking gdp and unemployment at 10.5% and rising, perhaps they should import some.

      1. with a shrinking gdp and unemployment at 10.5% and rising, perhaps they should import some“…

        Who? The US where government regulatory assault on business or France which could also use a governmental make over?

  3. Jon Murphy

    You mean to tell me that, when the government is given power, people will use that power to advance their own interests?

    Oh, if only there was some theory that could have predicted this? Maybe something that dealt with collective funds, the “Public,” if you were, and how they are allocated, “Choices” as it were.

    Oh, too bad.

    1. You mean to tell me that, when the government is given power, people will use that power to advance their own interests?

      As Jon Murphy would say:

      “mind= blown”

  4. Uber has a blog posting and video by its CEO, to explain their surge pricing model; riders may face higher prices at certain, higher demand, times on New Year’s Eve:

    http://blog.uber.com/uber-nye-2014
    http://vimeo.com/82915850

    Apparently, this is to pre-empt complaints from those that failed to ever grasp the concept of Supply and Demand.(you know… about half the adult population)

  5. Seattle Sam

    Make fun of France, but the Seattle City Council is eager to emulate them. The ordinance they have drafted would require ride-sharing companies, among a bevy of other rules, to obtain a $50,000 annual license to operate as a transportation network company, and have no more than 100 vehicles driving a maximum of 16 hours per week.

    1. @SS

      hey – check this link:

      http://www.iandrinstitute.org/statewide_i%26r.htm

      you guys in Washington State have the right to initiate referenda .. you can swat down laws and regulations you don’t like.. unlike us poor schmucks in Virginia.

      we just get laws and regulations and thats, that.

      you guys can mount real repeals out there.. why not?

      1. Seattle Sam

        Obviously you don’t know much about those reside in the Asylum of Seattle.

        I don’t believe there is a public ballot initiative process at the City level anyway.

        1. Citizen Buddy

          Seattle Sam,

          Here are list of all the City of Seattle Initiatives and your “Asylum of Seattle” remarks has another meaning, in which the City Council and Mayor of Seattle ignore this passed initative:

          “Initiative 30
          Shall Seattle enact an ordinance rescinding “City of Refuge” Resolution 27402; dissolving the Citizens’ Commission on Central America; and directing the Mayor, City Council and City Officials to cooperate in enforcement of immigration laws, among other matters?
          Dated Filed: January 16, 1986
          Disposition: Passed by voters at November 4, 1986 general election, 77325 – 64308
          Clerk File Number: 294569″

        2. Jon Murphy

          Let’s not forget that citizen ballots really mean nothing. In Massachusetts, they keep holding ballots to reduce the income tax and the sales tax. Both get passed. It goes to the legislature and gets ignored.

          Relying on a citizen ballot initiative is as about as useful as chickens voting to kick the fox out of the hen house.

          1. not without some successes:

            http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2012/11/ballot-measures-2012-results

            but one of the intrinsic values of voter initiatives is the sentiment of voters.

            even if it is an advisory referenda or an ignored referenda.. one that has ..say a 75% approval rate should be a clear warning to elected…

            remember a “poll” of folks who might or intend to vote is not as good as a “poll” of real voters!

            With a good number of people questioning the expansion and intrusion of government these days. one would think that even an advisory poll would send a message.

          2. Jon Murphy

            Why do you assume that?

          3. At a minimum its an officially sanction poll on the subject with a larger sample size than unofficial polls. The Ma votes must be advisory not mandatory. Also folks must not be sufficiently bent out of shape to throw the bums who ignore their votes out.

          4. true – but still a much more significant opportunity to educate other voters and begin a movement that can actually lead to change…

            there have been several successful referenda in 2013 and others that gave a clear picture of citizen sentiment.

            it ain’t nirvana.. but it’s a heck of lot better than …say Virginia where you get squat for your views…

          5. Jon Murphy

            Few ballot measures are mandatory. That’s the point of a Republic style of government. You have representatives who vote on laws, not the population.

            But voters are hardly rational. Take Congress: an 11% approval rating with an 89% reelection rate. Explain that.

          6. Jon

            But voters are hardly rational. Take Congress: an 11% approval rating with an 89% reelection rate. Explain that.

            I think polls indicate that most people say they are happy with their own representatives, it’s those other jerks they don’t approve of. Their own guy gets them stuff. Those other creeps try to take things from them.

            Go figure.

          7. Jon Murphy

            Exactly, Ron. So this whole idea that politicians respond to “the will of the voters” is pure bullshit.

          8. Jon Murphy

            There’s also the problem that only about 40% of Americans vote, which means that, assuming (as some foolishly do) that the voters agree 100% with their candidates’ position(s), at any given time, the elected only represent a minority.

          9. Jon

            Exactly, Ron. So this whole idea that politicians respond to “the will of the voters” is pure bullshit.

            Exactly.

            There’s also the problem that only about 40% of Americans vote, which means that, assuming (as some foolishly do) that the voters agree 100% with their candidates’ position(s), at any given time, the elected only represent a minority.

            A tiny minority. Probably the people who spent the most the get their candidate elected.

            I can understand people not being enthusiastic about voting, considering the poor choices available at all levels.

            I would love to see an additional choice on every ballot for “None of the Above”, which, if it got the most votes, would mean that office would remain empty.

          10. Jon,

            In case you are unaware of it, the Colorado Constitution, and several other state constitutions, allow for amending said Constitution via popular vote.

          11. indeed…

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_Amendment_64

            citizens initiated the vote against the restrictive laws and regulations and overturned them on a vote.

            in those states that do allow citizens to initiate referenda – citizens have far more liberty and ability to vote against laws and regulations they think are wrong.

          12. “in those states that do allow citizens to initiate referenda – citizens have far more liberty and ability to vote against laws and regulations they think are wrong.” – TubeGuy#3LG200+

            It’s a double-edged sword. A constitution that can be amended just by getting 50%-plus-one of the voters on a particular election day to vote for it, is a constitution set up to abuse its constituents.

            It’s also schizophrenic. The same State Constitution that has TABOR limits on taxing and spending also has Amendment 23, which was engineered by the teacher’s unions, and guarantees annual increases in K-12 spending.

            At the very least, using voter-initiative to amend the State Constitution should require affirmative votes in two separate elections.

          13. but if you are libertarian and want to roll back regulations, especially those that protect taxi cartels and the like – you’d just want a 51% threshold, right?

            Sounds like more of a chance to roll back bad regulation that not having referenda initiative which is the case in many states in the east.

            IN the states that do allow citizens to initiate referenda, you have at least a chance to roll back stuff.. like they did in Colorado … with pot…right?

    2. Jon Murphy

      It’s incredibly foolish, Sam.

  6. Citizen Buddy

    It is hard to get a cab in Paris because only ~16,000 are licensed by the Paris Police. Forget about hailing a cab because it is rarely successful unless a taxi stand can be found.

    The fifteen extra minutes is worth the wait for a reputable service. Make reservations ahead of time for late night/early morning, because it’s “difficile” to get any transport in the City of Lights between 12:30am(0.30am) and 6am. Also, a lot of services will provide an English speaking driver upon request.

  7. Someone is going to come up with an app to back-time the requests by 15 minutes. Also, when legislation becomes as absurd as this enforcement is difficult to impossible.

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