AEIdeas

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Discussion: (4 comments)

  1. The war has been too costly in money and manpower and the drone strikes seem to have created many enemies around the world as the pictures of innocent women and children being killed have turned people who are sympathetic to the US against it. Why not let the Afghans and Pakistanis to their own affairs? Carry on with commercial affairs but stay away from their politics just as the Chinese are doing.

  2. Vangel:

    We left the “Afghans and Pakistanis to their own affairs” after the Soviet withdrawal in 1989. The result: a nuclear Pakistan supporting terrorism; and a war-torn Afghanistan occupied by al Qaeda and Taliban. Why have we forgotten 9/11 so soon? Should we repeat the mistake?

    1. Vangel:

      We left the “Afghans and Pakistanis to their own affairs” after the Soviet withdrawal in 1989. The result: a nuclear Pakistan supporting terrorism; and a war-torn Afghanistan occupied by al Qaeda and Taliban. Why have we forgotten 9/11 so soon? Should we repeat the mistake?

      You have made the same mistake. 9/11 was an act by the people that you trained to fight the Soviets in the first place. They were pissed off at you not because you wore jeans and were ‘free’ but because you supported dictators in Muslim lands and even stationed your troops there. The fact is that you are still refusing to learn what the real lesson is.

      My first lesson on suicide bombers had nothing to do with some Marxist professor talking against the United States. It was Allan Bloom, who was explaining his interpretative essay at the back of his translation of The Republic. I was fascinated because some of the people I used to live with in the shadow of the Iron Curtain used to have similar insights.

      Bloom was talking about thymos, which was something that the young were usually ‘afflicted’ with and made them do some very stupid things. (Stupid as far as mature and thoughtful individuals were concerned.) Bloom defined it at the time as spiritedness, a natural resentment towards injustice.

      In the discussion some of us brought up religious extremists and their sducidal acts but Bloom pointed out that if one were to look at suicide bombers and similar attacks we would find that the overwhelming number came from a Marxist group that had no religious sentiment to rile up its members. They killed themselves and their victims because they were pissed off at an occupying force that was mistreating their communities, families, and country. End of story. Suicide for them was a defensive act to repel occupiers, not to invade another country.

      I think that Bloom, who taught many of the neocons, that now drive the debate, was on the money but that his students and colleagues have ‘conveniently’ forgotten his teaching. And it seems they are still quite good at pushing your buttons and getting you to do the other things that Bloom advocated when discussing Plato’s book. Those shadows on the wall are not what you think they are my friend, and those casting them are not exactly who or what you think they are.

  3. Chris Hightower

    It’s a win, win!

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