Ahmad K. Majidyar

Share Mark as favorite

While the peaceful and democratic transfer of power marks a milestone in Afghanistan’s tumultuous history, the country faces mounting security and governance challenges as international support is diminishing. To ensure long-term stability, the following five priorities should top the new government’s agenda.

Share Mark as favorite

Image Credit: By US Department of State, Wikimedia Commons

While the Obama administration should welcome the inauguration of the new government in Kabul, it will be a grave mistake if the US and its allies use Afghanistan’s peaceful transfer of power as an excuse to justify their exit strategy.

Share Mark as favorite

isafmedia (Flickr) (CC)

Advances made by the Taliban make it imperative that Afghanistan’s competing presidential candidates form a unity government and address pressing political and security issues sooner than later.

Share Mark as favorite

Shi'ite Muslims attend Friday prayers at the Imam Hussein shrine in the holy city of Kerbala July 18, 2014. Iraq's top Shi'ite Muslim cleric has criticized the government and international agencies for failing to do enough to help hundreds of thousands of civilians displaced by fighting between government forces and Sunni Islamist insurgents.

AEI resident scholar Michael Rubin and senior research associate Ahmad Majidyar have released a booklet highlighting the diversity of Shi’ite communities in the Middle East, the political and diplomatic issues unique to each one, and efforts by each to resist Iranian political and religious domination. 

Share Mark as favorite

Please join analysts from the United States and across the Middle East to discuss Shi‘ite strategies to preserve communal independence and how the United States can successfully work with Shi‘ite communities outside Iran.

Share Mark as favorite

Supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad burn a photo Qatar’s Emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, during a demonstration at the Avenue Habib Bourguiba in Tunis, April 20, 2013.

As sectarian violence rages Iraq and Syria and simmers across the broader region, the role of the Middle East’s diverse Shi’ite communities has become increasingly important for regional stability.

Share Mark as favorite

In Pakistan, anti-Shi’ite violence is unremitting and risks destabilizing the country and engulfing the surrounding region. Pakistani political and military leadership must develop a comprehensive plan that includes reforming the country’s education system, promoting interfaith harmony, and curbing foreign funding for extremist groups.

Share Mark as favorite

Image Credit: shutterstock

Share Mark as favorite

Muhammad Naeem (L), a spokesman for the Office of the Taliban of Afghanistan speaks during the opening of the Taliban Afghanistan Political Office in Doha June 18, 2013.

The past 36 years of conflict in Afghanistan provide valuable lessons about the advantages and the perils of negotiating with insurgents. Pursuing negotiation with the Taliban as an exit strategy is both unrealistic and dangerous.

Share Mark as favorite

isafmedia (Flickr) (CC)

Share Mark as favorite

A man burns tires to block a road in Beirut's southern suburbs, to demand more security in the capital's suburb areas, January 21, 2014.

With Iranian support, Hezbollah—a predominantly Shi’ite group and a US-designated terrorist organization—has emerged as the most powerful military and political force in Lebanon.

Open
Refine Content