Jon Entine

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Used appropriately, genetic engineering is a fantastic tool—to create new life-saving drugs and encourage cutting edge ecologically based farming technique.

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The uncomfortably high number of bee deaths is alarming, but reckless calls for action without definitive scientific evidence could result in precipitous regulations.

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Is it possible that some of the diseases that plague us have helped humans survive and even thrive through evolutionary history?

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In sharp contrast to public views about GMOs, 89% of scientists believe genetically modified foods are safe.

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Hyperbole, scientists say, obscures the complex story of what’s really happening to bees and why—and the risks that advocacy groups and activist journalists risk of driving science and agricultural regulations into a policy ditch.

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Reports that honey bees are dying in unusually high numbers has concerned many scientists, farmers and beekeepers, and  gripped the public.

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Modern eugenic aspirations are not about the draconian top-down measures promoted by the Nazis and their ilk.

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The Environmental Protection Agency today announced formal registration of Dow’s Enlist Duo herbicide. The seeds in Dow’s Enlist system—genetically modified corn and soybeans—won approval for commercial use last month from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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A coalition some of the most influential activist groups is intensifying a campaign to pressure Starbucks into using only organic milk in its coffee products.

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The National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences held two days of discussions  on the controversial issue of crop biotechnology as it collects information for a spring 2016 report. 

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