carbon tax - AEI

carbon tax

Share Mark as favorite

This report investigates the impact of a revenue-neutral carbon tax whereby revenues raised from a $25/ton carbon tax are used to reduce the tax rate on wage income by a commensurate amount.

Share Mark as favorite

Republican lawmakers should not assume that a tax on carbon paired with offsetting tax cuts would disproportionately or adversely impact their constituents.

Share Mark as favorite

Republicans have made tremendous progress in pushing through cuts in corporate and other taxes. It’s time to fill the gaps they’ve left behind with a carbon tax and greater benefits for working families.

Share Mark as favorite

Tax reform is desperately needed and instituting a carbon tax is a market-based approach to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases and reducing the national deficit. The carbon tax can be used to lower corporate taxes or return the revenues back to the people in the form of increased social security benefits.

Share Mark as favorite

Carbon tax eitc

Although in principle a carbon tax that lowers wages could affect EITC benefits and thus impact low-to-moderate income households, the likely magnitude of the effects is very small.

Share Mark as favorite

In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Aparna Mathur hosts Senators Brian Schatz (D-HI) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), who present their carbon tax proposal.

Share Mark as favorite

This week on Banter, Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Myron Ebell and the Partnership for Responsible Growth’s George Frampton debate the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a carbon tax.

Share Mark as favorite

Senators Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Brian Schatz (D-HI) will unveil their new carbon tax proposal, and panelists will debate the implications of such a proposal.

Share Mark as favorite

I remain confused. I have attacked ExxonMobil, and I have defended ExxonMobil. Negin makes it clear that I oppose ExxonMobil’s preferred climate policies, while others seem to argue that I am in ExxonMobil’s hip pocket.

Share Mark as favorite

The Climate Leadership Council is advocating a carbon tax that funds a “carbon dividend” paid to all Americans. Despite what the CLC says, that is not revenue-neutral.

Share Mark as favorite

Alex Brill has continued the widespread practice of economists pretending to be politicians with his short new essay arguing for a carbon tax. Ben Zycher shows the central problem with that consensus viewpoint.

Sort By:

Refine Content:

Scholar

Additional Keywords:

Refine Results

or to save searches.

Open
Refine Content