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President Trump laid out an inspiring vision for the future of Korea and a comprehensive outline to compete with China. But there are many potential pitfalls and minefields along the way—and the hard work of translating visions and aspirations into concrete plans and policies has just begun.

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Join AEI and leading Japan expert Yuki Tatsumi for a discussion on Michael Auslin’s new monograph and the implications of a more assertive Japan for US foreign policy.

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As Asia’s most developed democracy, Japan can be a key partner for the United States in championing liberal values.

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Implementing Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s vision of a more regionally and internationally engaged foreign policy is essential to the future of Japan and the region.

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One of President Trump’s goals in Asia is to revive the quad: an alignment of the region’s four most powerful democracies: the United States, Japan, India and Australia. While a welcome development, it’s far too early to say whether it will grow into what Asia needs: a robust and enduring security partnership of democracies united by similar concerns.

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It’s time for India to shed its misgivings about a quadrilateral partnership in the Indo-Pacific.

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President Donald Trump’s upcoming trip to Asia will provide him with an opportunity to outline his emerging strategic approach to the region. No objective of the trip is more important than signaling that the United States takes this geopolitical rivalry seriously.

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Asian nations themselves understand that the Sino-Japanese relationship is Asia’s other great game, and is in many ways, an eternal competition.

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When it comes to North Korea, there is no good option; all the choices are unsavory. A nuclear Japan, however, may be the least unsavory of all the choices, especially if its prospect causes China to reconsider the wisdom of its policies.

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The United States and Japan can create a bilateral free trade and investment agreement that both sides will sign and ratify. Such an agreement will not require Japan to make agriculture market concessions beyond the Trans-Pacific Partnership or the recent draft agreement with Europe. Yet, it will offer the U.S. not only diplomatic improvement but also worthwhile economical benefits

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Foal Eagle training exercise

It’s no longer enough for the US, Japan, and South Korea to simply profess the ironclad nature of their alliances. At a time when enemies and rivals are seeking to fray the ties that bind them together, the allies must move to deepen those ties.

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