Foreign and Defense Policy - AEI

Foreign and Defense Policy

Share Mark as favorite

Marilyn’s vision, counsel, and generosity transformed AEI’s work and community, and was of great service to our nation. We will miss her and offer our condolences to her family and many friends.

Share Mark as favorite

The Nehru-Gandhi dynasty has stayed close to or at the summit of Indian politics for nearly 100 years. But for the 47-year-old Mr. Gandhi—the son, grandson and great-grandson of prime ministers—the path to power appears increasingly steep.

Share Mark as favorite

Rex Tillerson’s pleas to Pyongyang at the Atlantic Council again showed his inability to get on the same page as the president when it comes to messaging. It’s yet another sign his departure is long overdue.

Share Mark as favorite

In his Party report, President Xi made it clear China needs a military prepared to fight and win wars, and that the military would play an increasingly prominent role in Chinese foreign policy.

Share Mark as favorite

Reforming the roles and responsibilities of our special operations forces will more evenly distribute the burden of addressing our nation’s most pressing security challenges. In addition, it will support efforts to reduce pressure on SOF and their families and will also obviate the need to lower standards to increase SOF ranks.

Share Mark as favorite

Martial law is part of Duterte’s plan to ensure the “total eradication” of Islamist extremists — but this approach can backfire. Here’s why.

Share Mark as favorite

With Vladimir Putin set to be re-elected in 2018, what do we know about where he plans to steer Russia? While Putin’s election campaign promises to go in one direction, his actions tell a different story.

Share Mark as favorite

President Trump is also demonstrating how a president can continue to command the national agenda, regardless of the comings and goings of domestic politics. For all these reasons, those who think Alabama marks the beginning of the end for Trump should think again.

Share Mark as favorite

The bottom line is that Washington should assume that any Korean conflict involving large-scale US military operations will trigger a significant Chinese military intervention.

Share Mark as favorite

The best defense against authoritarian sharp power is a good offense. Policymakers should accept it is not wrong to aggressively sharpen our soft power advantages and use them pointedly.

Sort By:

Refine Content:

Scholar

Additional Keywords:

Refine Results

or to save searches.

Open
Refine Content