Middle East

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steve bannon

Preserving American secrets is important, and oaths sworn as part of the security clearance process should mean something. Neither partisan affiliation nor rank should be a factor in adjudicating violations.

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In the predominately Shiite Saudi Arabian town of Awamiya, tensions have flared surrounding construction plans. Experts discuss the battling sides and the possibility of foreign interference.

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Given the obstacles Kurds face, what can they expect the day after they vote for independence?

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Until and unless Pakistan becomes convinced that interfering in Afghanistan is too dangerous and too costly, no realistic US military scenario in Afghanistan can succeed.

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As Turkey’s prisoners start to stand trial, here’s some advice for Mr. Erdogan, his prosecutors, and his court journalists: If the world is to believe the Turkish government’s allegations, it’s important to pursue not just one theory, but all of them.

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Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is often described by Western press, academics, and even some diplomats as a ‘reformer’ or ‘moderate.’ However, there is nothing in his record to justify such labels.

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Many Iraqi political groups and militias receive overt or covert Iranian support. However, the friendship and cooperation between the two neighbors is often exaggerated.

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Many Western diplomats hoped that the lifting of sanctions and new investments that accompanied the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) would bolster the hands of more reform-minded elements within the Iranian political spectrum. If money talks, however, it seems that more hardline elements have the upper hand in where and how to allocate funding.

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India is the largest exporter of labor in the world. With 8.5 million citizens working in the Persian Gulf, it has good reason to closely follow the ongoing spat between the Gulf Cooperation Council and Qatar.

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The political feud between Saudi Arabia and Qatar continues as both countries have begun using radio and internet advertisements to sway public opinion. Experts discuss the impact of these new developments on American policymakers.

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