Constitution - AEI

Constitution

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3rd circuit court judge brett kavanaugh stands in front of Donald trump at his nomination to the Supreme Court announcement

When the Framers designed the Constitution’s separation of powers, they thought that Congress would be the most powerful of the three branches. Today, most observers of government would agree that Congress is by far the weakest.

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SCOTUS Brett Kavanaugh

As a reason for objecting to Kavanaugh’s appointment, the claim that the judge would destroy affordable health care is not supported by records from his many years of government service.

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robert muller Donald trump investigation

Despite what President Trump’s opponents say, the Constitution makes clear that the president has the power to order the Justice Department to end any and all investigations he wishes.

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh

Progressives are right to fear Judge Brett Kavanaugh, but it is not his views on abortion, race, or gay marriage that will haunt them.

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Stock image of scales of justice with the figure of a court judge in the background blurred out.

Political democracy depends on the existence of a responsible opposition that challenges the party in power vigorously while remaining loyal to our basic institutions.

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This week on Banter, AEI Visiting Fellow Jay Cost joins the show to discuss his new book “The Price of Greatness: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and the Creation of American Oligarchy.”

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SCOTUS Brett Kavanaugh

President Trump may like to spring a surprise on the news media, but with his announcement Monday night of Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court he went with the safe choice.

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Trump’s approach to choosing Anthony Kennedy’s successor will reveal much about how he intends to win in 2020.

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oklahoma teachers walkout

The Supreme Court‘s widely expected decision in Janus v. AFSCME struck down public sector unions’ ability to charge agency fees to public employees who aren’t union members, delivering a significant blow to teachers unions’ power.

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