Society and Culture

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Join AEI for a discussion of a new report by W. Bradford Wilcox and Wendy Wang showing how millennials who follow the “success sequence” — completing high school, getting a job, and marrying before having a child — are more likely to steer clear of poverty and into the middle class.

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Join AEI as Gerard Robinson moderates a discussion on the state of historically black colleges and universities and what opportunities and challenges lie ahead.

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The transition from active duty to civilian life can be a difficult. A premature decision to pursue long-term disability compensation can lead many veterans into a cycle of invalidism.

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Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE) and Arthur Brooks discuss the senator’s new book, “The Vanishing American Adult” (St. Martin’s Press, May 2017), and how the decline of adulthood in America threatens our democracy and our society.

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Self-driving cars and similar technology will definitely change how our lives work, but it doesn’t mean the sudden death of jobs or tax revenue.

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President Trump is growing infamous for his insistence on loyalty among his staff. In increasingly polarized times, there is a comfort to associating with a tribe, but we must ask what risks are involved with prizing loyalty above all, and what is being lost in the process?

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Factual Feminist Christina Hoff Sommers

Research from Scott Lillienfeld says that the evidence for microaggressions is flimsy at best. Factual Feminist Christina Hoff Sommers explains.

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Charles Murray provides an easy to read chapter by chapter explanation of his groundbreaking 1994 work, The Bell Curve.

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Carla Javits, the president and CEO of the Roberts Enterprise Development Fund (REDF), joined the show to discuss her work supporting social enterprises.

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Cognitive partitioning will continue. It cannot be stopped, because the forces driving it cannot be stopped. But America can choose to preserve a society in which every citizen has access to the central satisfactions of life.

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It is not a matter of ideology but empiricism to conclude that unless the traditional family and traditional communities of faith make a comeback, the declines in social capital that are already causing so much deterioration in our civic culture will continue

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Communities that once gave the support and love necessary for human flourishing have all but vanished in the face of our relentless drive towards individualism. We find ourselves today in a country in crisis.

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Part II was circumscribed, taking on social behaviors one at a time, focusing on causal roles, with the analysis restricted to whites wherever the data permitted. We now turn to the national scene. This means considering all races and ethnic groups, which leads to the most controversial issues we will discuss.

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Whereas Part I dealt with positive outcomes—attainment of high educational levels, prestigious occupations, high incomes—Part II presents our best estimate of how much intelligence has to do with America’s most pressing social problems. The short answer is “quite a lot,” and the reason is that different levels of cognitive ability are associated with different patterns of social behavior.

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